Win a Copy of Eleanor Burns’ new book, Tales of First Ladies!

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799 comments » books, contests, fun

My quilt library is stuffed after 30 years of collecting quilting books, and quilt trends have changed a great deal by the looks of my books but, there is one segment of quilt books that don’t change and that is historical.  I have remarked about this before in previous book reviews and blogs; I LOVE quilt history and seek quilt books that provide that kind of information.

Tales of First Ladies is such a book and is told through the pen of the very amiable Eleanor Burns. Cleverly written, we are given historical information not only about several first ladies but also about the White House and significant events from colonial America.  This is all told through authentic quilt blocks and quilts from that era.

Oh, my, gosh!  How gracious and strong were the characters of these women who, by events created by their husbands, were placed in positions of authority and responsibility whether they were “groomed” for what they were about to do.  They were defined by their husbands and his position yet were required to negotiate a very burdensome job without acknowledgement.  The strength of character goes without saying!

This book is a must for the quilter that appreciates the historical significance of the quilts they piece.  It’s not trendy, but will never go out of style!

From now until February 5th, you can enter to win a copy of this wonderful book.  On February 6th, we will select three winners.  One grand prize winner will take home a copy of Tales of First Ladies and a Neutral Thread Set.  Two runner-up winners will win a book.  All you have to do to enter is answer this question:
 
What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?

Rules: One entry per person.  No purchase necessary.  To be qualified to win, you must have a mailing address in the US or Canada. You must provide us with a valid email address so that we can contact you if you win.  Contest ends 11:59 pm on Sunday, February 5th.  Good luck!


799 responses to “Win a Copy of Eleanor Burns’ new book, Tales of First Ladies!”

  1. Robin Says:
    01/30/2012 7:36 am

    I would say the Great Depression.

    Reply
  2. Nancy George Says:
    01/30/2012 7:40 am

    I would love to add copy of Eleanor Burns new book to my library. Her designs are beautiful. Thanks

    Reply
  3. Shelia Says:
    01/30/2012 7:47 am

    I’m not sure I would have a certain answer to the question. I think their are a lot of things that play a large historical part in quilting. I would love to win this book. I have seen excerts from it and believe the history that it tells goes great with the blocks. Thanks for the opportunity to win CT.

    Reply
  4. Stephanie Says:
    01/30/2012 8:26 am

    I absolutely love Eleanor Burns. I was lucky enough to be one of her assistants at last year’s Sew Expo at the Puyallup fair, a dream come true! I love her books and I would be honored to add this one to my collection, please? She is so sweet and a joy to talk with! Just love her!

    Reply
  5. elsa Says:
    01/30/2012 8:30 am

    I’d have to say that all quilts are significant. I think when quilts were first made it was out of necessity, using old clothes so as not to waste anything. Then as a way to make connection with other women, it became a very social thing. Now it’s a way of expressing creativity. I’m very lucky to have friends that quilt and we get together on a regular basis and to be part of a quilt guild. Everyone is very creative and helpful too.
    Thanks so much for the giveaway ~ this book looks lovely and I admire Eleanor Burns a lot.

    Reply
  6. Amanda Says:
    01/30/2012 8:37 am

    I believe that the sewing machine must be the most significant contribution to the art of quilting. I think that less than 10% of us would quilt if we had to do it all by hand. Thank You!

    Reply
  7. kaholly Says:
    01/30/2012 9:19 am

    I believe that introducing quilt patterns to magazine and newspaper publications turned the corner on the popularity of quilting for the average woman.

    Reply
  8. Chris Says:
    01/30/2012 10:32 am

    History defines itself by the people who create it: people living their lives, making decisions (good or bad) that effect the lives of others and write our history books. American history has seen presidents and their wives in the public eye who were nurtured and raised by caring, loving families. Picture the mothers, grandmothers and aunts working at a quilting frame while young children sleep nearby, tucked under quilts made by those families who taught them values and ethics they carried all the way to the White House. Quilts/quilting played a huge part in forming the strength and character of people who carry the responsibility of our nation.

    Reply
  9. Connie White Says:
    01/30/2012 10:34 am

    There have been numerous historical contributions to quilting, but I believe the most important is the use of clothing, flour sacks, etc. being used to make quilts to keep the quilter’s family warm.
    I have several Eleanor Burns books and would love to add this one to them. Also, she has very interesting tidbits of history on her tv show and I would love to read more of her tales.

    Reply
  10. Gayle L. Says:
    01/30/2012 10:35 am

    I believe that the old Singer machines were a very great part or contribution to the quilters. They made it so much easier to put together a top. I have a lot of Eleanor Burn’s books and would love to be able to add this one to my collection. Thanks!

    Reply
  11. Kathie L Says:
    01/30/2012 11:02 am

    Since I wouldn’t be a quilter without a sewing machine (hand piecing and quilting are not my thing), I’d have to say the invention of the sewing machine really expanded quilting to the masses. Thanks for the giveaway. Kathie L in Allentown

    Reply
  12. alice oickle Says:
    01/30/2012 11:36 am

    She was my first teacher.

    Reply
  13. Mandie Burrell Says:
    01/30/2012 11:36 am

    I’d say politics! And wartimes

    Reply
  14. Dawn Fehr Says:
    01/30/2012 11:39 am

    The book or books would be awesome to win. The greatest contribution to quilting would be the necessity to keep warm and the resourcefulness to use what material they had on had at the time!

    Reply
  15. Susan Brooks Says:
    01/30/2012 11:39 am

    The Industrial Revolution made fabric affordable for the masses. I know because I grew up in Lowell Ma, the place were the mills were first built on a large scale.
    http://www.nps.gov/lowe/index.htm
    Site of the nations first urban National Park.

    Reply
  16. Linda Cartwright Says:
    01/30/2012 11:40 am

    I think the slave quilts with the underground quilt codes were a significant historical contribution to quilting.

    Reply
  17. Debbie St.Germain Says:
    01/30/2012 11:41 am

    I think Immigration was a big plus for quilting and the designs that were bought here from other countries. These woman came here, then moved throughout the states and shared their knowledge with others.
    Debbie

    Reply
  18. Debbie St.Germain Says:
    01/30/2012 11:41 am

    I think Immigration was a big plus for quilting and the designs that were bought here from other countries. These woman came here, then moved throughout the states and shared their knowledge with others.
    Debbie

    Reply
  19. Debbie St.Germain Says:
    01/30/2012 11:41 am

    I think Immigration was a big plus for quilting and the designs that were bought here from other countries. These woman came here, then moved throughout the states and shared their knowledge with others.
    Debbie

    Reply
  20. Linda Gordon Says:
    01/30/2012 11:42 am

    Women making warm, beautiful coverings with limited resources in our expanding country.

    Reply
  21. Jessie Dahl Says:
    01/30/2012 11:43 am

    I feel the most important historical contribution is ongoing – the passing of quilting from generation to generation. I learned to quilt from my grandmother who taught my mom and my sisters. My grandmother learned from her family. I get to talk about quilting to friends.
    It’s the passing of this information – what my family does compared to your family and how we can makes those tricks work together – that allows quilting to get better every generation.
    My 2 year old loves matching the fabrics up and helping me pick colors. I’m excited to be able to pass the tradition to my daughter.

    Reply
  22. Rhonda Craven Says:
    01/30/2012 11:43 am

    I love Eleanor Burns! She is the greatest.

    Reply
  23. Sharon Jergens Says:
    01/30/2012 11:45 am

    Hand quilters had their own distinctive stitch; therefore, a lot of history can be followed through it. If someone can identify the quilter, then the period it was made can easily be established. I think hand quilting is the way to go; however, it is becoming a lost art. Come on Ladies, we can’t let that happen.

    Reply
  24. Carol Vickers Says:
    01/30/2012 11:46 am

    I also have to agree with the invention of the sewing machine. Few of today’s quilters would have the time to handpiece and handquilt many projects in their lifetime.

    Reply
  25. Melissa Staib Says:
    01/30/2012 11:46 am

    This may almost seem a long shot, but I think one of the biggest contributions to the quilting industry was the invention of the cotton gin. This revolutionized the way that cotton was manufactured opening the doors for cloth to be mass produced. Imagine if we still had to hand comb cotton and process it? While the technology is outdated at this point, without it… we might not be where we are and would not have so many wonderful fabrics to choose from.

    Reply
  26. Jacqueline Celestine Says:
    01/30/2012 11:46 am

    I think the depression and feedsacks made the most historic contribution to quilting. Women were looking for an affordable outlet for their creativity and during this sad time in our history. Feedsacks and quilting filled this void and led to women across America learning to quilt.

    Reply
  27. Christine Ross Says:
    01/30/2012 11:47 am

    I have always loved any information/stories on the first ladies. What strong women. Then to add quilting into the picture. The best of both worlds.

    Reply
  28. Marilyn Vincent Says:
    01/30/2012 11:48 am

    Love Eleanor Burns. She makes it easier for first time or beginner quilters to understand what to do.

    Reply
  29. Jonnie Barton Says:
    01/30/2012 11:48 am

    Perseverance, strength and intelligence of those who made quilts, passing on knowledge so others will also succeed.

    Reply
  30. Joanne Deschenes Says:
    01/30/2012 11:49 am

    Electronic evolution. Now, quilters can search for patterns, fabrics, notions on web. They can also design with new software. There are now virtual quilting groups, so you don’t have to be right next to fellow quilters,

    Reply
  31. Patti Wohlford Says:
    01/30/2012 11:49 am

    I think this would be a facinating book! I am a big fan of Elenor Burns! I would love to win this book!

    Reply
  32. Mary C in Wa Says:
    01/30/2012 11:51 am

    The invention of the Rotary Cutter. It made history at my house when Eleanor would strip-cut and throw the left-overs back over her shoulder. Historically, I agree with the Immigration and “use it up mentality” of the ladies who traded scraps to make pretty quilts for their “Hope Chest” and ‘Dowery’.

    Reply
  33. Patti Wohlford Says:
    01/30/2012 11:52 am

    OOPS! I forgot to answer the question. I think the necessity to keep a family warm in winters contributed to the history of quilting then it evolved into hobbies and businesses!

    Reply
  34. Mark Mulder Says:
    01/30/2012 11:53 am

    I know that women used quilts and quilting as a way of expressing themselves in support of the varies causes of their time such as Temperance.

    Reply
  35. Linda Foster Says:
    01/30/2012 11:53 am

    I would love to win a copy of this book. I love her patterns they are so nice looking and quick.

    Reply
  36. Mary Valaika Says:
    01/30/2012 11:55 am

    America; and the melting pot. Quilting and the needlearts have been around for almost as long as people have. But American women took the art of the quilt and made it something uniquely their own, from the founding of the country. It was necessity coupled with all the beauty we could add.

    Reply
  37. Kathryn Hemstead Says:
    01/30/2012 12:00 pm

    From a today’s perspective I would have to say the sewing machine. From a historical perspective I would say the Underground Railroad as quilts were used in the underground railroad.

    Reply
  38. Jamie Lee Says:
    01/30/2012 12:01 pm

    That’s a tough question, but I’m going to say the Internet. It has opened up such a world of encouragement and inspiration and created it’s own worldwide community.

    Reply
  39. Paulette Adams Says:
    01/30/2012 12:03 pm

    I would love any book that Eleanor Burns has anything to do with. The art of quilting came about because of necessity and cold weather. . Scrapes left from clothing previous worn and tattered. Without the needle, where would we be today ? I can sit for hours with my needle and thread.

    Reply
  40. Anne Says:
    01/30/2012 12:03 pm

    The resurgence of quilting sparked by the 1976 Bicentennial to celebrate our nation’s cultural heritage.

    Reply
  41. Sheri G Says:
    01/30/2012 12:04 pm

    The civil war with the symbols hidden in the designs that were used to communicate with the underground railroad.

    Reply
  42. Judy Simmons Says:
    01/30/2012 12:06 pm

    In my own personal life, it’s the quilt that was passed down from a great aunt who made a fabulous crazy quilt in the late 1800’s. The elegant fabrics make me wonder what their original use was! The wonderful embroidery stitching around each piece makes me realize a generation before her must have been her teacher. Eleanor Burms book sounds like a good one to own! Thanks for the chance.

    Reply
  43. Karen Says:
    01/30/2012 12:08 pm

    I believe our early pioneers contributed significantly to the use of and need for quilts. They recycled whatever they could get their hands on to make the quilts they needed to keep warm. I would love to read Eleanor’s book!

    Reply
  44. Mary Belden Says:
    01/30/2012 12:10 pm

    I think the desire to connect with our past. Quilt link generations, both within and outside the structure of the family.

    Reply
  45. Nena Ayer Says:
    01/30/2012 12:10 pm

    Patterns. I love looking at quilt patterns and so many have a story of a historical time in the history of our country. Women have had a backseat in war times over the course of history simply for being women, but they still did what they could to contribute to the efforts. They made quilts to cover the soldiers at war or to raise money for arms. It’s so great that Elinor Burns has put this book together to honor those who have contributed throughout history through quilting – now a modern woman’s most cherished hobby.

    Reply
  46. Christine Says:
    01/30/2012 12:22 pm

    I would say the sewing machine, which made all kinds of sewing faster. Thanks for the entry; it looks like a great book.

    Reply
  47. Catherine Zaring Says:
    01/30/2012 12:24 pm

    As with so many other things, in the mid-19th century the Industrial Revolution had a greater impact on quilting than at any other period in history before or since. From textile mills to sewing machines and mass produced steel pins & needles, the Industrial Revolution put the tools for quilting and sewing into the hands of the American housewife at an affordable cost. Piecing by hand was available for all while the more affluent pieced their quilt tops by sewing machine. Either way, the affordability of machine-made fabric led to an explosion in quiltmaking, home sewing and pattern production.

    Reply
  48. Rhonda Desgranges Says:
    01/30/2012 12:26 pm

    I think that the need for warm coverings, during hard economic times, ie. the Westward Expansion, the Civil
    War, Great Depression, and the use of old clothing, feed sacks to make them with. Women passed this knowledge of quilting from one to another; generation to generation.

    Reply
  49. Cathy Says:
    01/30/2012 12:27 pm

    I think women in the history of quilting are amazing. They were amazing resourcefulness, adoptability, and strength show in their quilts and thus represent history at the time. Would LOVE to have this book and make the quilts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  50. Lesley Says:
    01/30/2012 12:28 pm

    I see that Christine above me said the same thing I was thinking, the invention of the sewing machine. Sounds like a great book.

    Reply
  51. VLAbney Says:
    01/30/2012 12:31 pm

    I think each has a story… thus each is important.:)

    Reply
  52. Daphne Brown Says:
    01/30/2012 12:32 pm

    The depression era is a very important part of quilting history. those people learned to use everything. From making clothes out of flour sacks to making quilts out of pieces of clothing.

    Reply
  53. Anne Jenkins Says:
    01/30/2012 12:40 pm

    I will answer on a personal level – my grandmother was the greatest contribution to my world of quilting. She was born in poverty on Jan. 1, 1900 and quilted all of her life. She died when I was 9 years old – too young for me to learn how to quilt from her. But she left behind quilts for me as a little girl and only a couple of years ago we found quilt tops she had made, but never quilted. They were given to me and with the gracious help of new dear friends, have started quilting them. I could barely even use a sewing machine when I took this up and now I am a full-fledged quilter, working on her quilts (hand quilting) and my own. Even though she has been gone for most of my life, she is the defining influence on this new interest of mine. I wouldn’t be a quilter (on on this website!) without her.

    Reply
  54. Mary White Says:
    01/30/2012 12:41 pm

    IMO, I think the most important historical contribution to quilting would be the economy. During the settler years (picture Little house on the Prairie) the depression era, etc, quilts were made with fabric scraps, worn out clothing and flour sacks. During the good years, more elaborate and matching/cohesive fabrics were used. Now that “lean years” are once again upon us, there has been an upsurge in the use of fabric scraps and books and patterns specifically designed for scraps (MY FAVORITE KIND OF QUILT!!)

    Reply
  55. Joni Readman Says:
    01/30/2012 12:42 pm

    Probably the marketing of an affordable sewing machine so our hard-working foremothers didn’t have to spend tedious hours laboring over hand stitching.

    Reply
  56. Sarah Landreth Says:
    01/30/2012 12:43 pm

    I could use some new thread…

    Reply
  57. Elizabeth Mylroie Says:
    01/30/2012 12:45 pm

    I was taught that we had to recycle and reuse everything and that is something quilting does! I have seen many cherished quilts made from the family’s clothes and from flour sack fabric! My parents were raised during that time of the great depression and I learned from them!

    Reply
  58. Phyllis Cousins Says:
    01/30/2012 12:53 pm

    American pioneer women had a great influence on quilting, with their philosophies of” “Use every last scrap”, and “Idle hands are the devils workshop.”

    Reply
  59. Fredricka Brown Says:
    01/30/2012 12:53 pm

    every era has its highlights. I have enjoyed reading the use of quilts for the underground railroad and during the wars.

    Reply
  60. Cat Lady Says:
    01/30/2012 1:18 pm

    The Bicentennial had a huge impact on quilting. In many areas quilting had become a lost art form since store bought blankets were so easily available for the majority of people. The Bicentennial and the quilt contests it had brought many people back to quilting and I believe really elevated quilting to an art form.

    Reply
  61. Brenda Ward Says:
    01/30/2012 1:22 pm

    I believe the most significant historical contribution to quilting would be the passing down of knowledge and skills to the next generation. Without this quilting would be a lost art.

    Reply
  62. Kellie Winckler Says:
    01/30/2012 1:27 pm

    I am not sure which era. I like the civil war and depression eras because women did what they could with what they had available.

    Reply
  63. ginger Says:
    01/30/2012 1:29 pm

    I would like to say that the rotary cutter had the biggest historical contribution to quilting, because it has made my ability to quilt so much easier. But I started quilting long after sewing machines were common in every woman’s household. I suspect they had a much larger impact on quilting when they were first introduced to the general public.
    Would love to win the new Eleanor Burns book & fabric pack!

    Reply
  64. Sallie Says:
    01/30/2012 1:32 pm

    I’d say the Industrial Revolution’s textile mills were the most significant historical contribution to quilting. Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  65. Dixie Says:
    01/30/2012 1:37 pm

    Most important contribution? I’m not sure…but I think the most interesting change in quilting is the evolution from quilting as necessity (to stay warm) to quilting as a therapeutic creative expression.

    Reply
  66. Linda Milward Says:
    01/30/2012 1:44 pm

    I love Eleanor Burns, you not only learn the blocks, but you learn the history behind them at the same time. I could watch her series over and over and never get tired. I would absolutely love this book!!

    Reply
  67. Becky F. Says:
    01/30/2012 1:45 pm

    I’m not sure about the most historical contribution to quilting, but my favorite bit of history about quilting is how quilts were used in the Underground Railroad.

    Reply
  68. Amanda Says:
    01/30/2012 1:48 pm

    I think the greatest contribution is that it has been passed down for so many generations and is now enjoying a revival as an art!

    Reply
  69. robin Says:
    01/30/2012 1:55 pm

    I think each historical era contributed its own mark to quilting. As the strata in the earth rock layers tell a history of the earth, so the qilts of each time period tell the story of the people of that time. This is the most wonderful thing about quilts!

    Reply
  70. Deborah H Says:
    01/30/2012 1:57 pm

    shoot, I have no better answers than what certain people have written here… guess I will have to purchase my own copy :)

    Reply
  71. Anne Grinley Says:
    01/30/2012 2:08 pm

    Would Love to have Elenor Burns new book.
    I feel that the Crazy Quilt dates way back in time to the present. Where It was learned that with simple stitches one could make something useful to keep warm. And with this quilt stitches were learned as to be creative and to add beautiful things that were treasured.
    Anne Grinley

    Reply
  72. chrissie w Says:
    01/30/2012 2:14 pm

    i think the bicenntenial was the greatest historical contribution to quilting, because it brought quilting back to life. i don’t think we would have seen the resurgance of quilting’s popularity if the bicenntenial celebrations hadn’t shone on light on it.

    Reply
  73. Birgit Hanson Says:
    01/30/2012 2:27 pm

    I think one of the most interesting aspects of quilting is the stories about how it kept women sane as they moved out west and left everything and everyone they knew behind. In that respect the biggest contribution historically to quilting would be the friendships that it nurtured and the happenings that were celebrated with a quilt, weddings, reaching the age of majority, honoring a friend or pastor or fundraising for a worthy cause.

    Reply
  74. Judy U Says:
    01/30/2012 2:28 pm

    Eleanor Burns would be my answer

    Reply
  75. Sandra Strickler Says:
    01/30/2012 2:33 pm

    I think the quilts that were also messages, or made for a reason, like the Underground Railroad and Author Quilts, may be.

    Reply
  76. Cheryl Rathke Says:
    01/30/2012 2:47 pm

    I love hearing how different blocks got their names. It’s been fun reading “Farmer’s Wife” and “Hobo Quilts” to get a sense of another time and place. I’ve also enjoyed all the Civil War anniversary quilting blogs – fun to see the symbolism in different blocks.

    Reply
  77. Susan Says:
    01/30/2012 3:01 pm

    That’s a big question with many possibilities for answers. Need and frugality combined with creativity are just the beginning. Things such as the invention of the sewing machine, the evolution of fabrics, the styles and trends of each generation are other aspects to be considered.

    Reply
  78. lindaroo Says:
    01/30/2012 3:09 pm

    I think I need to read this book to get an idea of historical significance! I will pitch in the idea that the internet is intensely affecting the art and craft of quilting. Fabric design and availability, techniques, block and quilt designs, art quilts, and all kinds of information are readily usable and shared around the world.

    Reply
  79. Cheryl Says:
    01/30/2012 3:15 pm

    I think quilters sharing with each other is the most significant influence. Past or present quilting wouldn’t change much if we didn’t share our ideas.

    Reply
  80. Valorie Bonk Says:
    01/30/2012 3:34 pm

    I think that the dyes that have come through time has really done wonderful things for quilters. We are so lucky to have such stable dyes now a days. When we look back at the quilts in the past and see how they deteriorated over time. I would love to see the patterns and read about the first ladies. What a great historical book for the time.
    It would be so wonderful to share the information with my quild members and quilters that I know.

    Reply
  81. Kathy Says:
    01/30/2012 3:34 pm

    Since we’re discussing first ladies of the US, I believe the most significant historical contribution to quilting was the railroad because now a wide variety of fabric both from domestic and imported were now available everywhere across the country. You might think of it as a precursor to internet sales.

    Reply
  82. Rosalie Hughes Says:
    01/30/2012 3:35 pm

    I truly believe it all started with a mother’s heart for her family. The need to make something to keep the family warm was so important to a wife and mother. So the idea came from necessity to cover those little beds with quilts made from whatever was around and could be used. Yes she was a strong women with hands that could milk a cow to ones that could give her little ones a soft touch on the cheek as she covered them with their warm little quilts.

    Reply
  83. Roxanna Says:
    01/30/2012 3:45 pm

    I enjoy historical novels, and am sure I would love the writings of our dear Eleanor. The introduction of photography showed how important quilting was to families when these loved quilts were used as backgrounds for snapshots.

    Reply
  84. Brenda Sanders Says:
    01/30/2012 4:04 pm

    I think the industrial revolution. The machines that allowed fabric to be mass produced, and thus cheaper, contributed greatly to any kind of craft that used fabric as a basis. The mass production of thread also helped, and of course, with mass production, both thread and fabrics quality became much more uniform.

    Reply
  85. Margaret Crockett Says:
    01/30/2012 4:11 pm

    The resourcefulness of women who sometimes had very little to work and all the wonderful treasures they have left of their intricate handwork.

    Reply
  86. Lori Says:
    01/30/2012 4:11 pm

    I think you wanted to make do with what you had even if it was a shirt that had holes in it. You know, you can’t throw that away. Cut out the torn parts and sew the pieces together! Now truly that is a way to stay warm without waste.

    Reply
  87. Charlotte Amaro Says:
    01/30/2012 4:41 pm

    I don’t know a great deal about quilting history but would like to learn more. Many of the good answers are already listed. The depression, for example, forced people to be more thrifty, and sewing machines made sewing easier and faster. Other household appliances made housework faster thus allowing for a little more “free” time that women could use for quilting. The Internet has certainly provided lessons and inspiration so women throughout the world and learn and communicate with others.

    Reply
  88. Nancy Nehez Says:
    01/30/2012 4:58 pm

    I think there’s many answers for this question. I would have to say slavery and the underground railroad played a big, significant contribution to quilting. The hidden messages in the quilts and the makers of those quilts is just fascinating. Thank you for the chance to win this wonderful book!

    Reply
  89. dona kremer Says:
    01/30/2012 5:04 pm

    So many great answers. For me the underground railroad and Dear Jane quilts both have historical significance.

    Reply
  90. Rhonda Says:
    01/30/2012 5:04 pm

    I have to agree that it was the invention of the sewing machine. What a great way to streamline the quilt making process.

    Reply
  91. Sandy A in St. Louis Says:
    01/30/2012 5:08 pm

    I believe the biggest historical contribution to quilting has been the sewing machine. It has made quilt making so much easier and has allowed more creativity to be shared, since more quilts can be made than when they were hand pieced

    Reply
  92. sharon lattis Says:
    01/30/2012 5:21 pm

    I think just the simple act of passing it from one generation to another. Thinking about quilts from different eras the fabric has changed but not the love and care put into them.

    Reply
  93. Carla Meier Says:
    01/30/2012 5:28 pm

    The bicentennial served as inspiration for us to look back into our history, to see how people lived, what was important to them. I got into quilting because of the historical aspect – making due with what you have. I have always been drawn to the more traditional quilt designs.

    Reply
  94. Elizabeth Adams Says:
    01/30/2012 5:31 pm

    Necessity I think would be the number one, and a woman’s desire to have something nice.

    Reply
  95. Joanne Brown Says:
    01/30/2012 5:34 pm

    The pioneers

    Reply
  96. Sue K Says:
    01/30/2012 5:50 pm

    The early settlers quilted out of necessity, slavery was also a big contributor to quilting, and the depression, all because women were trying to keep their families warm. What a wonderful craft to pass on through the generations. Eleanor Burns has captured some of the most traditional patterns and redesigned them for modern fabrics and machine piecing. Thanks!!!! And, I hope I win this very special book.

    Reply
  97. Barb Ostermeier Says:
    01/30/2012 5:50 pm

    I would just love this book. I have several of Eleanor’s Books and I love everyone. I was privilaged to meet her at the Houston Quilt Show. This would really make my day.

    Reply
  98. Sharon Leighton Says:
    01/30/2012 6:40 pm

    Would love to have my first Eleanor book!

    Reply
  99. cherie laswell Says:
    01/30/2012 6:44 pm

    Gosh, so many answers-I will have to say the sewing machine-this contribution was so instrumental in the everyday lives of women.

    Reply
  100. Fran Dixon Says:
    01/30/2012 6:58 pm

    Just writing things down and sharing–it then becomes historical. What we write down now will become historical. Sharing it with others has to be the best gift. Some day someone will look upon Eleanor Burns as contributing to the history of quilt making. I would love to have this book and hope it will be passed on and preserved.

    Reply
  101. Virginia Severson Says:
    01/30/2012 7:06 pm

    I believe quilting is multicultural not just in the US but around the world. Many people in many cultures make quilts or some form of bed cover. I also believe that quilt making has gone from necessity to art form, over and over again in historical times. There will always be good times or bad times throughout history. The history of quilts can show you those good and bad times.

    Reply
  102. Debbie St.Germain Says:
    01/30/2012 11:41 am

    I think Immigration was a big plus for quilting and the designs that were bought here from other countries. These woman came here, then moved throughout the states and shared their knowledge with others.
    Debbie

    Reply
  103. Debbie St.Germain Says:
    01/30/2012 11:41 am

    I think Immigration was a big plus for quilting and the designs that were bought here from other countries. These woman came here, then moved throughout the states and shared their knowledge with others.
    Debbie

    Reply
  104. Lolly Challice Says:
    01/30/2012 9:03 pm

    I’d like one of these…

    Reply
  105. Beezus Says:
    01/30/2012 9:42 pm

    I guess the industrial revolution is the single greatest contributor to quilting. I know that’s a massive answer, but it really is pretty amazing to think that fabric used to be made by hand and that zippers and velcro didn’t even exist. From mass produced fabric (and I’m thinking the cotton gin goes into this bucket!) to mass produced sewing machines with interchangeable parts, no other period has made life in the modern world as we know it.

    Reply
  106. Brenda Says:
    01/30/2012 11:35 pm

    Neccessity is the mother of all invention, sew it is with the quilts we crave to create.

    Reply
  107. Shelley Says:
    01/31/2012 5:30 am

    Early Magazines, both womens’ and farming, that published quilt patterns. I love Eleanor Burns’ books!!

    Reply
  108. Kathryn Says:
    01/31/2012 5:43 am

    There are so many comments I agree with. The sewing machine, the quilt patterns in the newspapers, the fabric flour sacks and just the need to keep warm. My grandmothers and my mother all made quilts and I intend to pass on my knowledge of quilt making to my posterity.

    Reply
  109. Donna Sykes Says:
    01/31/2012 6:42 am

    There sre so many things that contribute to the history of quilting such as the Underground Railroad and the Great Depression. Then there was the invention of the sewing machine and currently the world wide web. This looks like a great book that would make a great addition to my quilting library!

    Reply
  110. Jennie Steward Says:
    01/31/2012 7:56 am

    I think the industrial revolution played a significant part of contributing to the history of quilting…without it we wouldn’t have the sewing machine or even the cotton gin! I would love to have this book to read and learn from.

    Reply
  111. Jennifer Rosamond Says:
    01/31/2012 8:05 am

    I would say the necessity of using everything people had especially the pioneer women just to survive. And they created such beauty at the same time. Isn’t human ingenuity marvelous.

    Reply
  112. Regina Says:
    01/31/2012 9:18 am

    Sounds strange -but I would say the camera. Being able to photograph and share images of quilts, and memorialize them for all time – opened up the doors of quilting to so many.

    Reply
  113. Beth Cahalan Says:
    01/31/2012 9:24 am

    I think that publishing quilt patterns in the newspaper thereby bringing quilting to women had the most significant impact to quilting.

    Reply
  114. Sandy Says:
    01/31/2012 10:42 am

    What a nice give-a-way! Poverty comes to mind when I think of the earliest quiltmakers.

    Reply
  115. Lindsey Ray Says:
    01/31/2012 10:56 am

    I believe the Civil War had a great impact on quilting (particularly as I’ve inherited several Civil War era quilts from my grandma). It has spawned an entire genre of beautiful reproduction patterns and fabrics.

    Reply
  116. lynn Says:
    01/31/2012 11:05 am

    Hmm, that’s a tougher question than I thought at first. Maybe the availability of cotton and cotton fabrics for the mass market.

    Reply
  117. debra kinkade Says:
    01/31/2012 11:22 am

    Thats a tough one -so many answers.personally I think thre is no one contributor or factor from the time of slavery and pioneer times out of extrene necessity whether it be warmth or an emotional outlet. I think no matter what quilt we do or see has an impact. every major highlight in history has a definite impact or invention and the important and creative tool is the person behind the quilt. Have all of eleonors books and have been toa few of her lectures the last being in punta gorda fla last year from sew worth it What a thrill to have an opportunity to win your latest and greatest book since by prof. was a history teacher specialty wwII thanks again for the opportunity debra

    Reply
  118. Lou Ann Says:
    01/31/2012 11:28 am

    The largest impact that is seen today, is the ability of people who quilt to come together in so many ways. They have guilds, small groups, shopping parties, quilt shows, quilting bees, and just the many people willing to help in the store when you don’t know exactly how much fabric you need. It is a total sharing of a common interest!

    Reply
  119. Pam Recko Says:
    01/31/2012 12:33 pm

    I love looking at old quilts and I have a couple my grandmother and aunt made. While I don’t particularly like the dark colors, these women made their quilts with what they had to work with, left overs from making their clothes, feed sacks, I guess any cloth they could get their hands on. It is amazing to me how far the fabric industry has come, and that we all go crazy to buy the new fabrics and patterns.

    Reply
  120. Dixie Says:
    01/31/2012 1:33 pm

    Early quilters of course had a great impact because they developed & used what they had out of necessity but the avenues we have today to develop our patterns, skills, etc. are great too & have a great impact on quilting today.

    Reply
  121. Gina M Says:
    01/31/2012 1:58 pm

    In my lifetime… the greatest contribution to quilting is the rotary cutter and rulers. Eleanor Burns’ templates and quick techniques have been instrumental in making quilting easy and fast; important to women who lead busy lives today. Early in her ‘career’ she dumpster-dived for scraps of fabric from clothing manufacturers… and observed/learned their construction process as she de-constructed to re-use the scraps!

    Reply
  122. Michelle Kloeti Says:
    01/31/2012 2:10 pm

    Wow An Eleanor Burns Book! What a Fantastic give away! I would love to have it.

    Reply
  123. Marsel Says:
    01/31/2012 3:59 pm

    I think the most significant contribution has simply been the passing on of quilting skills from generation to generation. In the midst of plenty, of little, of peace, of turmoil…women have taken the time to pass down the skill and the love of quilting to younger women.

    Reply
  124. Linda Christianson Says:
    01/31/2012 4:13 pm

    What would quilting be without the sewing machine and the fabric and thread that is mass produced? We no longer make one quilt by hand and wear out our hands by doing it. When in the 1980 the rotary cutter made cutting the blocks for quilts even more of an Art and fun.

    Reply
  125. Deb Says:
    01/31/2012 7:09 pm

    I was blank on an answer but finally came up with the invention of the sewing machine. That one thing probably changed quilting quite a bit!

    Reply
  126. Barb Proz Says:
    01/31/2012 7:18 pm

    I believe the sewing machine was a great contributor to quilting, Quilts could be made faster and meant more people could benefit. I would love the book! Thanks, Barb

    Reply
  127. Linda Sue Robertson Says:
    01/31/2012 8:37 pm

    The Civil War and the underground railroad had significant influence where quilting is concerned. Of course the sewing machine helped too!! But there is so much history with quilt blocks and the underground railroad that saved many a life.

    Reply
  128. Diane C Says:
    02/01/2012 5:50 am

    I don’t know about the most significant historical contribution, but for me it was my grandma. Watching her sew both by hand and with a machine. I still have and treasure the quilt she made when I was 2.

    Reply
  129. Diana Hart Says:
    02/01/2012 9:05 am

    Women are creative by nature. Making quilts to bring comfort to the military and to those who have experienced life-changing events such as fires and tornadoes keep quilters busy today. In pioneer times, women quilted together as an important social event and many groups still do that today. Quilting is great and I hope it stays popular always.

    Reply
  130. Elizabeth Says:
    02/01/2012 9:05 am

    I believe that the contribution to quilting that is most notable is the recognition quilting is now getting. Museums are showing and studying quilts as are universities. PBS has a series and people in general are seeing quilts with uses other than packing furniture and over couches. Quilt history is becoming a part of life. I think it is great and hopefully in future generations it will continue.

    Reply
  131. Cherie Says:
    02/01/2012 9:08 am

    In the US, the bicentennial in 1976 certainly sparked a new interest in quilting. I think the internet with its blogs and other social media have made the craft more attractive to younger crafters.

    Reply
  132. Ruth Bechtold Says:
    02/01/2012 9:15 am

    The commercial printing of cotton fabrics opened up a vast variety of fabrics to work with.

    Reply
  133. Kate H Says:
    02/01/2012 9:15 am

    I think the skills of individual quilters, whether now or in years past are significant. Color ideas, fabric choices, design trends passed along through generations are what make quilting so interesting…whether the quilt is “needed for warmth” or just as a hobby.

    Reply
  134. Sue Kasper Says:
    02/01/2012 9:18 am

    The printing of patterns to share with everyone.

    Reply
  135. Susan Frederick Says:
    02/01/2012 9:24 am

    The Industrial Revolution, which allowed the development of mass-produced fabric and other products; and which allowed them to be distributed across a broad population. Virtually everyone was able to acquire the means with which to make a quilt, whether it was for function, beauty, or both.

    Reply
  136. Pam Says:
    02/01/2012 9:26 am

    I love to read about how the strong women before us were able to “make do” and make some of the most beautiful quilts ever without all the “gadgets” we are lucky to have today!

    Reply
  137. Cindy Says:
    02/01/2012 9:26 am

    I believe that necessity is the biggest historical contribution to quilting. Women needed to provide warm coverings for their families when they were without financial ability to purchase blankets. They used their creative abilities to utilize what they had and brought beauty to their homes while providing a basic essential of life.

    Reply
  138. bonbon Says:
    02/01/2012 9:30 am

    my birthday is February 6, and this year is a special one, not because of hitting an age milestone, I will be 58, but because I survived a stroke, and have had a very successful recovery, and I was able to get back to quilting.
    I would love to wake up and find out I had won this book,
    I already have a large collection of her books, she makes it easy to follow, and gives not only great directions, but sparks your imagination by showing different color combinations that can be used for the same patterns, that create different looks .
    she is such fun to watch.

    Reply
  139. Nonni Says:
    02/01/2012 9:41 am

    The availability of manufactured cotton fabric. Plain and simple!

    Reply
  140. Sharon Schmidt Says:
    02/01/2012 9:45 am

    I believe the most significent Historical contribution to quilting is to teach our generations to be creative with their hands and make good use of materials available to them.

    Reply
  141. Sheila Haddad Says:
    02/01/2012 9:45 am

    I think the “need to create” something. To express one’s self in a quilt was (and is) a marvelous outlet. If the need to create weren’t there, quilts would simply be whole cloth and tied….

    Reply
  142. Deb Manley Says:
    02/01/2012 9:52 am

    I would love to win this book. I believe the need for warm blankets brought on the resourcefulness of women in history. It had to be hard to find enough material to make into quilts. Most of the fabrics were so thread bare already.
    I love to watch her and would love to see her in person.

    Reply
  143. Jan Hood Says:
    02/01/2012 9:52 am

    I think one of the biggest historical significance is that quilts were made at times in history as items of necessity, especially during the wars. The transition has been enormous in they are now made for beauty, to express ones talents, and the joy of just making them.

    Reply
  144. Candy Sanders Says:
    02/01/2012 10:03 am

    I am lucky enough to live not too far from Eleanor’s San Marcos store. I must own every book she has published and have taken classes at her store. I must add this to my collection.

    Reply
  145. Addie Hosier Says:
    02/01/2012 10:04 am

    I love reading all the other replies. Someone else may have mentioned this but it bears repeating. In more recent history, the bicentennial of the United States in 1976 was a huge influence on quilting. Anything historic about America was highlighted during that time and quilting became really popular again. I remember clearly the resurgence of interest in quilting that has only gotten stronger since then. I remember when there were only fabric stores for dressmaking and home decor. Now it is hard to find such a store and quilt shops are everywhere and aren’t we glad!

    Reply
  146. Suzi S Says:
    02/01/2012 10:06 am

    The Civil War brought a need for quilts for the troops. The development of the sewing machine. There are so many answers to this question.

    Reply
  147. Joy Schneider Says:
    02/01/2012 10:08 am

    I believe the most significant historical contribution to quilting is in the origin of quilting. Pioneer women needed to keep their families warm, so created quilts from whatever fabrics they had available. This humble beginning has blossomed into a multi-billion dollar industry today.

    Reply
  148. Kathy Raabe Says:
    02/01/2012 10:13 am

    I wouldl love this book too! I think moving west had a lot to do with historical significance. They had to wear many layers of clothes that were later used for quilts. Unknown climates proved their hardiness and resourcefulness in clothing and covers. We cannot envision their hardships!!

    Reply
  149. Joy B in Southern Indiana Says:
    02/01/2012 10:15 am

    The need to stay warm and using old clothing to make utilitarian quilts.
    Love Eleanor Burns – my first quilt was one of her Quilt in a Day quilts – Lone Star.
    Thanks much!
    xoxo
    Joy

    Reply
  150. Ronda Barga Says:
    02/01/2012 10:17 am

    The 100 year quilt collection is my favorite. I really enjoyed seeing pictures of all the winning quilts and information about them. However, I am extremely happy that we have all the wonderful tools now, like rotary cutters, rulers, super sewing machines – it’s amazing how far we have come!

    Reply
  151. Debbie M Says:
    02/01/2012 10:19 am

    I love antique quilts. And I love knowing the history behind them. But I know I would never be making quilts if I didn’t have a sewing machine. (rotary equipment doesn’t hurt either ;) Thanks for the chance to win. I love learning the history of quilting.

    Reply
  152. Olivia Says:
    02/01/2012 10:20 am

    My immediate though was of the feed sacks that first made commercial fabric collectible. Where would all the major designers be without that collectible feel.
    Historically, however, my thoughts turn western migration. The thought of making something beautiful (and functional) for a new home is a seriously visceral thing to someone heading into the unknown.

    Reply
  153. Michele Van Epps Says:
    02/01/2012 10:20 am

    I think that the availability of affordable sewing machines changed home sewing and quilting dramatically. With the use of a sewing machine, women were able to sew more and become more creative. Sewing no longer had to be strictly utilitarian.

    Reply
  154. Karon McAlavy Says:
    02/01/2012 10:23 am

    The contribution to quilting that is most significant, I think, is the invention of the sewing machine and the invention of the rotary cutters and rulers and cutting mats. This made it easier to cut fabric without the templates that were used long ago. It greatly expand the ease of cutting fabric.

    Reply
  155. Arlene Adams Says:
    02/01/2012 10:25 am

    I would say the sewing machine. Eleanor Burns rules!! I love her quilt in a day books and have most of them; I have several books about quilting history in my library and this would be a wonderful addition.

    Reply
  156. SANDY MCDUFF Says:
    02/01/2012 10:27 am

    I think the most significant historical contribution to quilting would be people being very thrifty, yet artistic, with their limited resources.

    Reply
  157. Judy Lineberry Says:
    02/01/2012 10:28 am

    Mass production of material.

    Reply
  158. Sheila Says:
    02/01/2012 10:28 am

    Love to have this book to go with my E. Burns collections

    Reply
  159. joan Says:
    02/01/2012 10:28 am

    I think a significant thing for quilting was when the mills in New England started, making fabric afordable for most people.

    Reply
  160. Debi Says:
    02/01/2012 10:33 am

    I thing the biggest contribution had to be the invention of the sewing machine.

    Reply
  161. Toni Anne Says:
    02/01/2012 10:36 am

    The Civil War and keeping your family warm, necessity. Thanks for the great giveaway! ;->

    Reply
  162. Joanne Maner Says:
    02/01/2012 10:36 am

    In years past it would probably be necessity and the use of whatever was available at the time. Modern quilting has taken a wide turn. Quilting now is for enjoyment and it is possible due to the vast array of fabric, tools, patterns and of course our beloved sewing machines. The internet also draws many newcomers with the access to videos and chat groups. Quilting as evolved over the centuries and is going strong ;)

    Reply
  163. carol pincelli Says:
    02/01/2012 10:41 am

    I would LOVE that book! History and reproductions are my favorite subjects about quilting. I THINK THA MOST HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT THING IS THE SEWING MACHINE,

    Reply
  164. Julie Shipp Says:
    02/01/2012 10:41 am

    I would agree that the Depression had a significant impact, but there was a strong resurgence in the 70’s as well.

    Reply
  165. Katie Says:
    02/01/2012 10:42 am

    Though many others have also said it, I believe that the home sewing machine is the biggest signigicant contribution to quilting. With it, the time required to construct a quilt was greatly lessened, allowing women (or men) time for other chores, or to allow quilting to become a hobby instead of a chore itself. Though my patience for hand-sewing increases with ate, I can surely say I wouldn’t be a quilter if I had to do it ALL by hand today!

    Reply
  166. Jennifer Says:
    02/01/2012 10:42 am

    I feel the most important historical contribution is ongoing – the passing of quilting from generation to generation.

    Reply
  167. Vicky O'Malley Says:
    02/01/2012 10:44 am

    I would love a copy of this. I love history and quilt making, they go hand in hand. Thanks for making this possible. My grandmother did quilts from her old dresses which I was lucky to receive a couple of them.

    Reply
  168. Myrtle Yopp Says:
    02/01/2012 10:44 am

    I would say the Civil War and the Underground Railway history. Makes quilting so interesting to know some stories behind all the historical events. Thanks for the great giveaway!

    Reply
  169. ellen pearsall Says:
    02/01/2012 10:49 am

    I would love this book. The colors is what I find interesting along with the history.

    Reply
  170. Mary Ann Haak Says:
    02/01/2012 10:52 am

    The most significant contribution to historical quilting is the creativity of the people who made the quilts; the originality and beauty that early quilters first imagined, and then transferred to fabric is nothing short of genius!

    Reply
  171. MaryJean Says:
    02/01/2012 10:53 am

    I think that The Industrial Revolution both contributed to, and benefitted from the textile industry. For example the spinning jetty and power looms made fabric available to more people and at lower cost.

    Reply
  172. Barbara Perkins Says:
    02/01/2012 10:55 am

    I think that the sewing machine was the first innovation, followed by the rotary cutter. Both of these have made quilting much easier and faster.

    Reply
  173. glen parks Says:
    02/01/2012 10:56 am

    The most significant contribution to quilting would have to be the availability of the sewing machine to the common woman. My grandmother had a treadle singer and supported her family by making clothes and gowns for the elite in New Orleans at the turn of the century. She made many of the ball gowns for the Rex and Comus Mardi Gras Krewes’ women. She and her aunt raised my mother to be a seamstress herself. And then, I came along.
    Now THAT is a significant contribution! LOL.
    glen

    Reply
  174. Lisa Says:
    02/01/2012 11:00 am

    I think the most significant historical contribution would simply be creative necessity.

    Reply
  175. Peggy Brzoska Says:
    02/01/2012 11:10 am

    I would have to say the invention of the sewing machine. It effected how fast quilts could be finished and give us greater options in patterns and finishing techniques.

    Reply
  176. Charlotte Silber Says:
    02/01/2012 11:11 am

    I think quilting is significant to history because, the
    historical Underground Railway and the way the women saved every scrap of material they coult to create beautiful blankets to keep their family members warm and were given as wedding gifts.
    I love Eleanor Burns books, I own two, they were given to me as gifts from my family. Hint-Hint LOL

    Reply
  177. Sandy de'Venau Says:
    02/01/2012 11:15 am

    I think Family Albumn quilts are a wonderful way to share a special time in history with future generations. They tell a story all their own. You see the fabric of the time and a small part of someones life in the patterns used. I love History and Quilting and would love a copy of Eleanor Burns book.

    Reply
  178. Rosemary Newman Says:
    02/01/2012 11:17 am

    I am a big Eleanor Burns fan and I would love to add this book to my library.

    Reply
  179. Mariane Huckleberry Says:
    02/01/2012 11:19 am

    I believe that the creating of quilts out of necessity from whatever fabric that could be found, through the creation of patterns and using created fabric patterns are all part of the historic value of quilting. I love to read or hear about how and why certain patterns/embroidery etc are on a quilt. thank you!

    Reply
  180. Marreta Campbell Says:
    02/01/2012 11:19 am

    Necessity has to be at the root of quilting. Of course, the soul yearns for beauty, and after the functionality of the quilt, design and pattern allowed those early quilters the opportunity to express their creativity. And now a quilt is not only an item that implies warmth and comfort, it’s also decorative, shows skill and is an art all its own.

    Reply
  181. Shannon Mower Says:
    02/01/2012 11:23 am

    I think the most historically significant contribution to quilting is our ancestors. I have many memories of quilting with my mother and both grandmothers. Our forebears are those who with love took (by hand) a gentle stitch with the intent to pass on the love of their hearts to their children. Quilting is much more than an art form–it’s a heart form. That is why it has lasted the test of time…not because we’ve developed crazy awesome techniques…but because every quilt–made by someone famous or ordinary—has something special in it–the heart and love of its creator. The greatest contributor to quilting historically were regular people like you and me.

    Reply
  182. Janice Ryder Says:
    02/01/2012 11:25 am

    So many things come to mind, however the first answer that popped into my head was the quilts the slaves made guiding folks to the underground railroad.

    Reply
  183. Suzanne Beecham Says:
    02/01/2012 11:26 am

    Quilts can show how people lived, whether they had money, lived in cities or rural communities. They all tell a story about the person who made them and those who received them. Look forward to see Eleanor Burn’s book.

    Reply
  184. Heather Noordermeer Says:
    02/01/2012 11:28 am

    The sewing machine, the rotary cutter, the amazing amount of fabric available, all of these have contributed significantly to quilting. However I think the greatest contribution in the last quarter century has to be the internet! It has taken quilting from the neighborhood sewing circle to an international exchange of ideas, processes, fabrics, blocks, even the design of sewing rooms. To be able to see what other quilters are accomplishing, whether it is a world champion or a newbie, is the greatest motivator. To see that others have stashes and ufo’s and like to sit and look at the stash and ufo’s before going shopping for more fabric and starting something new brings joy to our hearts. The love of fabric is universal. The internet has brought that to our homes.

    Reply
  185. Phyllis Mogensen Kochert Says:
    02/01/2012 11:30 am

    I feel the most significant historical contribution to quilting is the chronicling of the lives of the people of the USA that have been recorded in the fabrics, threads, designs, recycling of used garments, etc. Quilts are a tapestry of our heritage. As I sew a quilt these days, I keep in mind that someone, someday will wonder about the woman who made it and who she was as a person.

    Reply
  186. Vicki Sprain Says:
    02/01/2012 11:33 am

    I think it is the invention of the sewing machine.

    Reply
  187. Dori M. Says:
    02/01/2012 11:34 am

    I think as women found more free time in their life, the quilting as a pleasure time became very important, and pushed all the various inovations we enjoy today.

    Reply
  188. Wendi Morris Says:
    02/01/2012 11:36 am

    I think the most significant contribution would be when they made quilts with different patterns and hung them up to show the slaves the escape route or safe path they should take to their freedom.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  189. Karen Says:
    02/01/2012 11:37 am

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting? I’m going to vote for a more recent history addition – the rotary cutter!

    Reply
  190. Mary Farus Says:
    02/01/2012 11:40 am

    History happens everyday, what we live and learn in the quilt world is history tomorrow. On this day,I feel that the many beautiful fabrics, the wonderful battings available, and the availability of the ladies and gentlemen who do our long arm quilting are an amazing contribuiton to quilt history. These people things are making history today, and people 100 years from now will be so amazed at what we quilters made with our primitive tools. I can hardly wait for someone to find one of my quilts 100 years from now and be totally amazed and wonder what type of person I was. I do this now with the antique quilts I have and see, and want it to happen to me. History is a forever thing.

    Reply
  191. Sandra Says:
    02/01/2012 11:40 am

    As always WOMEN. Although there are many men now into quilting. It was the women through need that brought it to what it is today.

    Reply
  192. susan howell Says:
    02/01/2012 11:40 am

    The most significant historical contribution of quilting
    is the ability of all people to share their beliefs and stories through quilting. You will find quilts that tell the hardships of just surviving or possibly a love story or the story of slavery and freedom. Quilting can be a record book of how society has grown and changed and how the quilt maker can teach future generations about what makes us who we are and how we live and what makes us happy or sad.

    Reply
  193. Bobbie Garris Says:
    02/01/2012 11:40 am

    I think the most significant historical contribution to quilting would be the publishing of quilt patterns in the Kansas City Star newspaper. The patterns were published weekly from 1928-1961 exposing and motivating thousands to quilt.

    Reply
  194. Laura C. Says:
    02/01/2012 11:43 am

    I believe it was when quilting changed from a “have to” to a “want to” way to spend their free time. Quilting is my therapy. When my work day has been hard, quilting takes me to a happy place and rejuvinates me.

    Reply
  195. Valerie Mik Says:
    02/01/2012 11:43 am

    I also think the invention of the sewing machine was the main factor. At first quilts were a function of necessity…the cold ..but as the machine came forth quilting became an enjoyment to be appreciated.

    Reply
  196. Pat Ziegler Says:
    02/01/2012 11:44 am

    I think the most recent historical contribution has to be the internet. There is so much available fabric, patterns, tutorials, sharing blogs and so much more.

    Reply
  197. Lynn Hyman Says:
    02/01/2012 11:47 am

    I think the most significant historical contribution to quilting was the Homestead Act, which meant that pioneers populated the western areas of our country. There were few stores. Women had to be creative in using scaps from clothing to make bed coverings –and turned those scraps into lovely quilts.

    Reply
  198. Diana Rose Says:
    02/01/2012 11:49 am

    Historically would have to be the sewing machine and the necessity to keep warm, the modern resurgence I would say the rotary cutter (at least it is for me)

    Reply
  199. Bonnie Goolsby Says:
    02/01/2012 11:49 am

    In earlier times, quilting was a necessity that also proved how innovative women could be. With very little time or money their quilts were useful, but also a work of art made from scrapes and their imagination.

    Reply
  200. Bonnie Mitchell Says:
    02/01/2012 11:49 am

    To me, the most significant contribution is the sewing machine and rotary cutter. They allow me to make and share my quilts in the tradition passed down by my Mother, Aunts and Grandmother. My favorite is collecting old feed sacks and hand quilting. Everytime I sit down to quilt I remember my family and what fun they had working on quilts together.

    Reply
  201. D'Ann Caron Says:
    02/01/2012 11:50 am

    I think the sewing machine, as I would never have the time or patience to havd quilt a large quilt. I have too many grandchildren and Great Grandchildren to hand quilt.

    Reply
  202. Peggy Simmons Says:
    02/01/2012 11:50 am

    I know the sewing machine, the rotary cutter, et. were extremely important for the growth of the quilting craze, but my vote would be for quilting shows. These shows attract quilters as well as non-quilters and provide the public with every type of quilt you can image. A quilt show 16 years ago is how I got interested and it is the passion of my life.

    Reply
  203. Jeanne Butler Says:
    02/01/2012 11:54 am

    I think the 1976 contest for the bicentennial contributed the most significant historical contribution. It brought quilting back into the limelight where it has stayed.

    Reply
  204. Barb B Says:
    02/01/2012 11:54 am

    I love to hear the stories of quilts made by the slaves of the South and all the ones used by the Underground Railroad. Thanks for the chance to win this book.

    Reply
  205. Carlene Buck Says:
    02/01/2012 12:03 pm

    I think the Women’s Movement. Women began to see more value in their creative contributions, received higher wages, and dared to be artists. Their improved incomes have provided them the ability to purchase “luxuries” such as fabric and books and travel to venues with displays of inspirational fiber art and classes to further improve their skills. This has changed quilting from a home art to an burgeoning commercial opportunity for manufacturers, publishers, and museums. Whether as a therapy or a income source, women have changed the world for women…and the men who are also engaged.

    Reply
  206. Pamela Silverman Says:
    02/01/2012 12:03 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting? I’m struggling with the question, but I believe the most significant historical contribution is fabric. You can look at fabric and learn so much about a quilt. It time of construction, the taste of the one who constructed it, what was in vogue at the time, colors of the time, what patterns were popular in that time frame, what techniques were popular. I love looking at quilts and trying to place their century or decade based on the fabric that was used.

    Reply
  207. Janet Says:
    02/01/2012 12:06 pm

    The most important historical contributrion to quilting was the spinning of cotton into thread by facotry machines in the Clarks’ factory in Paisley, Scotland in 1812.

    Reply
  208. Linda Price Says:
    02/01/2012 12:08 pm

    Quilts tell a story of the person creating the quilt at that time. Also the fabric and pattern contribute to the story. And all stories create history but I don’t think one can significantly stand out from another. I would love to read more . . . Pick me!

    Reply
  209. Regina Reece Says:
    02/01/2012 12:09 pm

    I think the biggest historical contribution to quilting was the sewing machine.

    Reply
  210. Kathleen Towers Says:
    02/01/2012 12:11 pm

    I think the biggest historical contribution to quilting was the invention of the sewing machine. As the world changed and women became busier with more responsibilities, the machine gave them the ability to sew and keep up with everything else.

    Reply
  211. Beth Marine Says:
    02/01/2012 12:15 pm

    Necessity and Need are, what I believe, is the most signigicant. I’ve done many historical quilts and read the histories surrounding them and it was fact that people didn’t have the resources or opporunities to purchase ready made quilts, so they did the best they could and made quilts from whatever they had. As we moved into the age of electicity, by far the most significant was and is the sewing machine. I’ve made quilts 100% by hand and I’ve made many quilts 100% by machine…a machine isn’t necessary but it sure makes it easier.

    Reply
  212. Jeneace Says:
    02/01/2012 12:15 pm

    I think the biggest historical contribution to quilting was the Ameican flag. I’m sure Betsy Ross must have been a quilter. Because of her creativity we have our American flag!

    Reply
  213. Cindy B Says:
    02/01/2012 12:15 pm

    I think one of the greatest historical contribution to quilting was the Western Ho movement of families traveling in covered wagons. Many pieced scrap blocks were made one by one as the women made the long journey. New block designs were sewn and given names of items seen or endured along the way. Our Eleanor has given us a new gem of a book and I’m happy I have the chance to win one!

    Reply
  214. Liz Foster Says:
    02/01/2012 12:16 pm

    I think that quilt have played a roll in history for the story they tell, each one is a story of the quilter and the time she lived in. TOdays quilt offer the same stories even if they are reproductions fromthe past.
    I love Elenors books and they way she teachs, her resent book give a look back at our own quilting history and that is a very good thing.

    Reply
  215. Nataly Says:
    02/01/2012 12:16 pm

    Quilting was the ancestor of recycling and reuse fabric, Save the planet!

    Reply
  216. Patricia Sakel Says:
    02/01/2012 12:17 pm

    I think that the most historical contribution to quilting was made by the women who designed and shared the original patterns. If not for their necessity to utilize all scraps of fabric, a desire to transform the mundane blanket into a canvas for their memories to be passed on may never have occured. Fashions come and go, the fabrics that make up our quilts change but the legacy of our patterns endures.

    Reply
  217. Mary Chevalier Says:
    02/01/2012 12:18 pm

    I would think the sewing machine as you could finish thing in a more timely manner

    Reply
  218. Bonnie Poyer Says:
    02/01/2012 12:18 pm

    With decent sewing needles being produced by factories in 1850, sewing garments and quilts became possible for everyone. Many quilters today still piece and quilt by hand. Even when quilts are made by machine, the hand sewing needle almost always is used to finish the binding and attach a label. The history of quilts would start then, as cloth from garments or feed sacks were used to make the first quilts.

    Reply
  219. donna rosengarten Says:
    02/01/2012 12:19 pm

    I think the most important historical contribution to quilting was the scissors! From the time of the cavemen & cavewomen we were able to attach one item to the other, but the scissors made it easier to start the shapes that make our quilts in this era. And then we go on to the rotary cutter!

    Reply
  220. Karen Fredrickson Says:
    02/01/2012 12:23 pm

    The transfering of the love of quilting from one generation to the next. It might skip a generation, but my grandmothers quilts are my pride and joy, and I hope my kids and grandkids enjoy my quilts and remember me for them.

    Reply
  221. Pat McDaniel Says:
    02/01/2012 12:23 pm

    The ability for these women to create and accomplish their quilts is with the materials they had is truely amazing. It it the kind of stuff strong counties are built on.
    I hope I win!

    Reply
  222. Jennifer Hope Says:
    02/01/2012 12:25 pm

    I’m a little fuzzy on the question …so I rewrote it:
    What do you believe is the most significant historical event that contributed to quilting? Would have to be wars and the Industrial Revolution.
    Or
    What do you believe is the most significant contribution that quilting has made to American history?
    Quilts are historically significant because they represent two things that made (and still make) America a great nation: 1) Creativity and 2)Community.

    Reply
  223. Donna Harrington Says:
    02/01/2012 12:28 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?
    I belive that the most significant historical contribution to quilting are the stories left behind by the creators of the quilts and in the quilts themselves. They tell about the hardships and triumphs that day to day living had in store. These are passed down from generation to generation and preserve the way of life then and now.

    Reply
  224. Karen Bowser Says:
    02/01/2012 12:35 pm

    My historical event would be my grandmother; “Goldie” was her name. Born in the late 1800 hundreds, a loving hard working Christian Lady that loved her family and always had a little time to quilt or crochet the most beautiful hand made items. My family had to move two thousand miles away for moms health and I always wished I could have had the opportunity to learn quilting from her. When we would go visit she would always have a project going on. Grandma loved to garden and her blankets always had beautiful flowers and colors, she would ask for our used clothes or left over fabric to be sent to her and a year or so later would appear the most beautiful blanket, even dads, grandpas and uncles ties. Only until 4 years ago I had a great friend, Dale, her in Tucson with Project Linus, take me under wing and for the first time I had the opportunity to make a simple childs blanket, to give away with love. This is what I call History.

    Reply
  225. Kathy Pollock Says:
    02/01/2012 12:36 pm

    I think every generation of women has contributed to quilting.Quilts from the turn of the century to present day.Every era learning from the women before the current generation.I would love to win Eleanors new book to add to the ones I already have

    Reply
  226. jane lee Says:
    02/01/2012 12:37 pm

    I think the greatest impact was the industrial revolution. Resources were now available to a wider group. Fabric and thread were now mass produced, sewing machines helped with efficiency, and print media increased communication between women regarding how to quilt and inspiring them with patterns they might not otherwise have been exposed to.

    Reply
  227. Linda Says:
    02/01/2012 12:37 pm

    Quilts are the exemplars of the adage “use up, make do”. With nimble fingers, creative imaginations, and skill with needle and scissors, we now have a collection that is as representative of our heritage and culture as any fine art.

    Reply
  228. Margaret C Says:
    02/01/2012 12:42 pm

    Oh I would love to win this book. I just love anything historical ~ it is just so fascinating what these women went thru to provide for their families…making quilts out of necessity along the way while travelling west. Not sure if I believe the underground railway quilt story, but it is fascinating. I think every aspect of history had it’s own contribution…from the westward travellers to the Betsy Ross’s.

    Reply
  229. Cheryl Signorelli Says:
    02/01/2012 12:44 pm

    I think quilt museums have contributed to quiling by helping us appreciate the hard work, creative ability and love that has gone into this craft – a craft that has been both a necessity and an art form.

    Reply
  230. Mickey Newman Says:
    02/01/2012 12:45 pm

    What attracts me to historical quilts is the history of the women who made them without our modern tools, machines, new simplified techniques, and the internet! These women who washed their clothes by hand, cooked on wood stoves or fireplaces, and hand sewed clothes, quilts, and mended until they used the leftovers for quilts. Can you imagine? With all this against them, they produced beautiful quilts that I cannot make today with an electric machine, a serger, classes, etc. They are definitely an inspiration to me!

    Reply
  231. Sherry Jagels Says:
    02/01/2012 12:47 pm

    I think using cotton material as feed sacks greatly helped women during hard times have material to make clothes and beautiful quilts. It was ingenous way to sell feed and other commodities. I would love to have this book. thanks.

    Reply
  232. Carolyn Hammett Says:
    02/01/2012 12:47 pm

    I believe that the 1976 show at the Met started this resurgence and interest in quilting. Howevers todys products, teachers, book, tv shows, and the internet have also added a great deal by making lessons and information more readily accessible than in Grandma’s day.

    Reply
  233. Bea Says:
    02/01/2012 12:47 pm

    I’d love to win this copy. not sure how to answer your question though, I have no clue… I do think my (younger) generation now has surged the quilting idea lately…. the trends are starting to change

    Reply
  234. Peggy Says:
    02/01/2012 12:48 pm

    I believe the greatest historical contribution to quilting would have to be the great women (and men) who actually recorded events in the patches and stitches of their quilts. It is wonderful that some of them labeled their quilts for future generations so we know of their efforts, and it is sad that so many were left for us to wonder, ponder and speculate about. What a lesson we can learn from their history — label our quilts recording historical events and leave a legacy.

    Reply
  235. Deb Wille Says:
    02/01/2012 12:48 pm

    I believe it to be the artistic value produced by each quilter to tell thier story at that time in their lives.

    Reply
  236. Gloria Ashley Says:
    02/01/2012 12:54 pm

    I think the greatest historical impact on quilting would be the invention of the sewing machine. This allowed women to make quilts and clothing faster and easier.

    Reply
  237. Mary Lou Ballin Says:
    02/01/2012 12:54 pm

    Oh – This Book is right up my alley – love quilting history – the old patterns – stories behind them. What a outlet for all especially during difficult times – hardships – loss of loved ones to be able to become absorbed in the making of something useful – warm – cozy -full of memeories – how scare fabrics, needles, thread were for all those that managed to create those wonderful quilts that everyone to this day are still trying to achieve the same goals – what an abundance we have now – can think back to my Mom and Grandmother using the feedsacks for clothes and the scraps for the quilts to keep us warm – they would be so in awe of all that is available to us now – how fortunate we are to have a lot of the information that has been gleemed from the ones who began this wonderful craft and hobby.
    We all would love to win this book I am sure.

    Reply
  238. Judi Burr Says:
    02/01/2012 12:59 pm

    I believe the most important historical contribution to quilting is the meaning behind the quilts. It could be a happy occasion, in memory of someone/something, honoring someone/something, or having a hidden message.

    Reply
  239. Cynthia Sandberg Says:
    02/01/2012 1:00 pm

    Besides having Eleanor create her Quilt in a Day series of books, we need to look back at the way quilters got their patterns. The Kansas City Star published quilt patterns that inspired new generations to make quilts. The US Army asked for quilts during WWI that kept our soldiers warm and the quilting bees that happened whenever women needed a reason to be together. These all helped to expand the base of quilting patterns all quilters use today. Without patterns to learn from, quilters would never continue after their first failed attempt! Look at all those PHD’s and UFO’s we have in our stash!

    Reply
  240. Marilynn Walther Says:
    02/01/2012 1:02 pm

    I would love so much to win the Elenor Burns book. I do not think I even have a chance with so many entries. She is my favorite quilting teacher. She knows it all.

    Reply
  241. Marilynn Walther Says:
    02/01/2012 1:02 pm

    I would love so much to win the Elenor Burns book. I do not think I even have a chance with so many entries. She is my favorite quilting teacher. She knows it all.

    Reply
  242. Marilynn Walther Says:
    02/01/2012 1:02 pm

    I would love so much to win the Elenor Burns book. I do not think I even have a chance with so many entries. She is my favorite quilting teacher. She knows it all.

    Reply
  243. Susan Says:
    02/01/2012 1:05 pm

    Settling the old west, industrial revolution, and invention of the sewing machine.

    Reply
  244. Sandra Says:
    02/01/2012 1:07 pm

    From my point of view, two of the greatest historical contributions to quilting are the invention of the rotary cutter along with the introduction of a wide variety of specialty rulers. Both of these things have opened up quilting to a whole new generation of quilters, who might not have embraced the inexact methods of measuring and cutting from the past.

    Reply
  245. Peggy Mislock Says:
    02/01/2012 1:07 pm

    I believe that the most significant historical contribution quilts have made has been there unintended record of American life. I’m speaking of traditional quilts. They seem to map how our nation changed and evolved. Originally made out of necessity using scraps of fabrics from worn out clothes to the beautiful and extravagant quilts we have today made from the finest fabrics and threads from all over the world. From the shirting calicos of the 1800’s to the beautiful and vibrant batiks that came out of the tie-dye craze of the ’60s. Patterns have evolved from simple scissor-cut squares to intricate patterns as technology became more sophisticated. Quilts have mapped the happiness and joy of growing families to the sorrows of losing loved ones from war or illness. They are windows to our souls and past.

    Reply
  246. Wynona McCranie Says:
    02/01/2012 1:08 pm

    Reading through all these responses has covered all aspects of an answer as to what quilting means. The necessity of keeping your family warm, the invention of the sewing machine, textile mills to weave beautiful cloth, all the wonderful notions used to complete your quilts, and now the processes to enhance your creativity of making beautiful quilts to admire and use. Thanks for the opportunity to try to win Eleanor Burns’ latest book. It would be a great addition to my quilting library. My talented, beautiful and resourceful grandmother, who was handicapped by deafness, was my inspiration and influence in sewing and quilting.

    Reply
  247. Sue Swick Says:
    02/01/2012 1:10 pm

    Quilt patterns. I know I started the love of quilts by looking at all the beautiful patterns in quilt magazines.

    Reply
  248. Tamera Rooke Says:
    02/01/2012 1:12 pm

    I don’t know if this is a “most significant historical contribution to quilting” but for me the rotary cutter sure made it alot easier.

    Reply
  249. Lynne Says:
    02/01/2012 1:12 pm

    I think quilting in an of itself leaves such a history, that picking just one is impossible. The trail of quilting corresponds to the ups and downs of society and history itself, from the historical quilting, to the history of needles, fabric and even sewing machines… quilting reciprocates and produces it’s own history.

    Reply
  250. Gloria Pietruszka Says:
    02/01/2012 1:12 pm

    I think the greatest historical signifigance is that quilts were made out of necessity. They were made from bits of scraps of any and all fabric that could be found.
    Many quilts told a story of their origin. Love reading about quilt history.

    Reply
  251. Jeanette Says:
    02/01/2012 1:12 pm

    I agree with what so many have already written…the sewing machine, availibility of fabric, rotary cutter and mat, magazine articles, published patterns, TV shows, the internet, BUT the biggest contributor to my taking up quilting was watching Eleanor Burns on a Public Television show. She made it look so interesting and easy that I just had to give it a try. I have now been an addicted quilter for several years and I still love learning all kinds of new things. I also enjoy all of the history that Eleanor includes in so many of her instructions. She is the greatest.

    Reply
  252. Doris Blanchard Says:
    02/01/2012 1:14 pm

    I think the sewing machine was the most significant.

    Reply
  253. Janet Crossman Says:
    02/01/2012 1:14 pm

    I feel it is the people of many years ago that realied the importance of saving and preserving these wonderful works of art for their importance at the times and the importance to all you can still enjoy them today in museums and families that have kept them in good condition.

    Reply
  254. Doralee Wilson Says:
    02/01/2012 1:15 pm

    I would agree that the sewing machine had the greatest influence on quilting; however my greatest admiration has to go to the women who had nothing but the light of the fire, one needle, and old worn out clothing for fabric, and yet produced some of the most beautiful quilts I’ve ever seen. I’m thankful for my rotary cutter, rulers for every occasion, and beautiful fabrics!

    Reply
  255. Dee L Says:
    02/01/2012 1:16 pm

    Winter time on the Prarie, nothing to do but quilt!

    Reply
  256. Janet Crossman Says:
    02/01/2012 1:19 pm

    I believe that it is the fact that people from history realied the importance of retaining these quilts for others to see and to preserve them for historical purposes, how they were made, materials used, where, etc…

    Reply
  257. Sandra Timmons Says:
    02/01/2012 1:19 pm

    I enjoy Eleanor Burns. I am collecting the blocks from her Quilt in a Day Block party. The sewing machine would have to be the greatest contribution to our love of quilting. Thanks for a chance to win such a prize. This is definitely becoming an addition to my quilting library of books.
    Sandi T.
    sandit1@sbcglobal.net

    Reply
  258. Mary G Says:
    02/01/2012 1:21 pm

    The Industrial Revolution was definitely the turning point, when cotton was mass produced and the sewing machine just made the art of quilting easier.
    Eleanor Burns was my very first teacher on PBS, when I was sick in bed for a few months. Never been so inspired… Would love to have this book in my collection.
    Thanks for the chance.

    Reply
  259. Barbara Kelly Says:
    02/01/2012 1:21 pm

    Jane Stickle or the Undergroud Quilts

    Reply
  260. Fredericka Aiken Says:
    02/01/2012 1:23 pm

    Please enter me in your book contest. Thank you,
    Fredericka Aiken

    Reply
  261. Helen Kulwicki Says:
    02/01/2012 1:23 pm

    I think it is the desire of women to be creative and frugal.

    Reply
  262. Rose Landon Says:
    02/01/2012 1:23 pm

    I think the most signicant historical contribution to quilting has to be the women who have made the quilts. Each has a story and oh what tears and secrets the quilts may hold. Without the the love and labor we would not have such a wonderful art form today. I am grateful to these grand ladies of years ago their willingness to share and pass on these things. Oh what a great pleasure it has been in my life.

    Reply
  263. Holly LeBlanc Says:
    02/01/2012 1:24 pm

    Economic hard times when people see they need to recycle and “make do” as my Granny would say.
    Necessity is the mother of invention,
    Mothers relate our history to us and quilts can achieve both of these goals

    Reply
  264. Sharon Stuart Says:
    02/01/2012 1:24 pm

    The combination of all quilters from all areas and all countries designing and quilting their own designs and then sharing and learning from each other.

    Reply
  265. Lisa Miller Says:
    02/01/2012 1:24 pm

    The industrial revolution made fabric available to the masses at a cheaper cost. The sewing machine made quilting faster. Dyes made the fabric more exciting. Eleanor Burns made quilting easier for the average person. The Internet now makes it easier to get patterns and fabric and learn about new trends and products. No one thing makes quilting what it is today. It is a team thing. It takes a village of enthusiastic quilters.

    Reply
  266. Fredericka Aiken Says:
    02/01/2012 1:25 pm

    The invention of the cotton gin.

    Reply
  267. Rita Scott Says:
    02/01/2012 1:28 pm

    We must all remember the history and where and when it all started.

    Reply
  268. Judy Maggio Says:
    02/01/2012 1:28 pm

    I believe the greatest historical contribution to quilting was the moment the first quilt was hung in that museum display. What a validation of being just a quilter.

    Reply
  269. Jeannine Stoddard Says:
    02/01/2012 1:29 pm

    This history of quilts is so fascinating that there are too many good answers to the question. I think the gradual shift in quilts just being something to keep people warm to being an artform is significant. Not to mention that it is the best therapy around!

    Reply
  270. Louise Deatherage Says:
    02/01/2012 1:30 pm

    For me, the most significant historial contribution to quilting is the evolution from utilitarian to art quilts, and all the changes in the tools to make that possible. What a wonderful time we live in to experience this evolution and share the benefits with our small grandchildren. It is awesome to imagine where they will take it from here.

    Reply
  271. Judy Dykema Says:
    02/01/2012 1:30 pm

    I think the most historical contribution would be the quilts that hang in the Smithsonian and other museums and the stories that tell of the struggles of the pioneers who came before us.

    Reply
  272. Kathy Oppelt Says:
    02/01/2012 1:31 pm

    Really tough question to answer…I think every era has had its own profound effect on the arts in general, quilting in specific. Hard times bring forth resourcefulness in materials (scrap quilts, Gee’s Bend), while money and idle time brought us the more ornate quilts with embellishments. Overall, the largest impact may have been the industrial revolution – not just the weaving but also the spinning of yarns were faster, and of course the sewing machine! I can’t wait to see and read this book!

    Reply
  273. Sharon Stoehr Says:
    02/01/2012 1:36 pm

    I would say the different fabric available today. There are more colors and patterns that can spark one’s imagination.

    Reply
  274. Marjorie Says:
    02/01/2012 1:37 pm

    The Civil War is perhaps one of the most defining events in our nation’s history. Many of our most popular quilt designs, and variations of them, were first used as signals for the Underground Railroad that aided many slaves to achieve their freedom from slavery. The colors and block designs, as well as the placement of the blocks, all were significant and created a secret roadmap in plain view. The stories of these quilts continue today to help us remember this period of our history, and has contributed significantly to our rich quilting experiences.

    Reply
  275. maryJane biltz Says:
    02/01/2012 1:41 pm

    The use of quilts as signals on the Underground Railroad.

    Reply
  276. Jackie Roisler Says:
    02/01/2012 1:42 pm

    Historical contribution to the quilting community? I feel that applause should go to those that share how, when, by whom and pass along their knowledge/skill to others who seek to learn about quilting. This are the famous, the authors, designers, those that teach, even the person who works the cutting table and helps you figure out what is needed to finish the quilting project.

    Reply
  277. Kim Riley Says:
    02/01/2012 1:43 pm

    I think the most historical contribution was the invention of the sewing machine. It contributed to the revival of quilting especially today when so many women have to work to make a living. It is a time savers for those who love to quilt.

    Reply
  278. Laura Says:
    02/01/2012 1:44 pm

    I would say the civil war is one of the most significant historical contribution to quilting. I have a sister who’s doing a civil war quilt blog and well I, myself have my mind set on doing a dear jane quilt sometime soon :)

    Reply
  279. Carie Says:
    02/01/2012 1:44 pm

    I would have to say the Industrial Revolution made fabric less expensive and therefore more available to women quilters. Would love to read the book!

    Reply
  280. Pat Woody Says:
    02/01/2012 1:45 pm

    I believe the rotary cutter and numerous rulers have been very important to the growth of the many quilters.

    Reply
  281. Cindy in FL Says:
    02/01/2012 1:46 pm

    The historical contribution is the need to create beauty right where you are with what you have on hand. This has been the driving force for all quilters through the centuries. Thanks for the giveaway.

    Reply
  282. colleen wedge Says:
    02/01/2012 1:50 pm

    I believe the incredible resourcefulness and creativity of quilters responding to the invention of ‘labor saving’ devices and turning them to quilty applications has had a huge impact. And I especially love and honor that quilters through the ages have epitomized the sentiments of ‘waste not, want not’, ‘use it up, wear it out, and make do’. Quilters who don’t have what they need will figure out a way to use what they have and quilters look at every walk of life and manufacturing to to satisfy their need to create. Consider the flooring tool we now have refined to dozens of styles of rotary cutters.

    Reply
  283. Mary Nelson Says:
    02/01/2012 1:51 pm

    I think the most historic contribution to quilting would be the invention of the sewing machine and all the off shoots it created. The current resurgence of quilting is tied to the ease with which we can stitch our tops and finish the quilting with long arm machine. While hand stitching is still an option, the ability to quickly piece and complete a quilt is due to the sewing machine.

    Reply
  284. donna dennis Says:
    02/01/2012 1:52 pm

    The industrial revolution with the availability of fabric and the invention of the sewing machine. And of course the passion of women to combine function and beauty.

    Reply
  285. Deanna Carveth Says:
    02/01/2012 1:52 pm

    Lots of inventions and events triggered changes in how and why we sew. Keeping warm was the impetus, use of every available scrap of leather, fabric, lace so as to waste nothing was probably what led to piecing blocks. The history of quilting keeps us connected to our history, reminding us we are part of a beautiful, functional continuum. I love all my sewing / quilting sisters! (and brothers too.)
    Deanna

    Reply
  286. Gramajojo Says:
    02/01/2012 1:53 pm

    I believe that the underground railroad and the quilt codes is the most significant historical contribution to quilting. I love Eleanor Burns and if you asked what is the most significant contribution to quilting in the 21st century, I would say her. Please, pick me.

    Reply
  287. Margaret Suding Says:
    02/01/2012 1:54 pm

    I think that the most significant historical contribution to quilting is the quilters- all the women and men who pass on the tradition. They have kept it going, improving it through time, and allowing us to enjoy it.

    Reply
  288. Karen Krause Says:
    02/01/2012 1:56 pm

    I am a huge fan of Eleanor Burns, and would love to win her new book. I think I have almost all of them.

    Reply
  289. judy cleveland Says:
    02/01/2012 1:59 pm

    I’d say the history of time from one generation to another spending time together and sharing life. Eleanor Burns’ methods gave me the courage to try quilting and I’m absolutely addicted to her methods.

    Reply
  290. AnnS Hamill Says:
    02/01/2012 2:00 pm

    Love Eleanor Burns!

    Reply
  291. Rosalie Says:
    02/01/2012 2:00 pm

    I think that it is the time warn yet gracious act of sharing with others that has kept quilting alive and growing for centuries. How wonderful it is to be a part of such an important part of our history! Thank you for the chance to win these wonderful prizes.

    Reply
  292. Joanne Says:
    02/01/2012 2:00 pm

    Samuel Slater brought the English textile mill designs to the U.S. through memorization because those secrets were guarded carefully. He helped start the textile industry in the U.S. This made cloth more affordable to women in the U.S. and would encourage more quilt making.

    Reply
  293. Cheri Williams Says:
    02/01/2012 2:01 pm

    I would say that the Civil War was a great contributor to the advancement of quilting.
    Would love to have Eleanor Burns new book.
    I enjoy the historical side of the quilts also.

    Reply
  294. Nancy Owen Says:
    02/01/2012 2:02 pm

    I think The Great Depression would have resulted in many quilts being made.

    Reply
  295. Marg Willard Says:
    02/01/2012 2:02 pm

    What fun to put on a contest, & a lovely addition to ones collection of patterns (& maybe threads). It’s very important that we maintaine history; some quilts are absolutally outstanding; more impressive is most of it was done all by hand. We are fortunate to have technology & some very talented & clever people to recreate a lot of these designs. I’m actually working on a replica quilt of 1898; however enlarged from 4″ to 7″ blocks. I’m looking forward to finishing it.

    Reply
  296. Shari Says:
    02/01/2012 2:03 pm

    WOW, great question. Could be so many things but I think probably the invention of the sewing machine made is easier so more quilted but also the great depression and using every single scrap of fabric you had for clothes or quilts and being cold and hungry made people quilt more too.

    Reply
  297. Marty Kiser Says:
    02/01/2012 2:04 pm

    I enjoy civil war history. Any patterns I can find during this time period interest me most.

    Reply
  298. Karen Tankersley Says:
    02/01/2012 2:05 pm

    I collect Eleanor Burns books, especially love the ones with history, so would be so pleased to win this book, I am just starting her Underground Railroad quilt in 6 in squares.

    Reply
  299. Joyce Besemer Says:
    02/01/2012 2:07 pm

    I believe the most significant historical contribution that quilting has made is the passing down from generation to generation a craft of value, a learning tool, an opportunity to share your story and a memory. Every time I sit at my quilt frame I know that I am surrounded by all the generations of mothers and grandmothers that taught their young children to quilt, who have taught their children to quilt.

    Reply
  300. Shirley Gilchrist Says:
    02/01/2012 2:07 pm

    The need for bedding combined with the need to beautify homes were the historical and current incentives behind the surge in quilting.

    Reply
  301. Jackie Farraar Says:
    02/01/2012 2:07 pm

    I would love to have this book!

    Reply
  302. Linda Rae Says:
    02/01/2012 2:07 pm

    I believe the most important contribution to quilting was the industial revelution. It allowed fabric to be made cheaply and be bought by every woman for her sewing needs. Than came the singer sewing machine. Again the industrial revelution allowed it to be made inexpensively. It could be afforded by the simple farm wife. They even had a singer penny bank to save up for the sewing machine. It was so affordable it put a sewing machine in almost every home (that wanted one)and spread quilting and home sewing across the land.

    Reply
  303. Mary Jane Cardwell Says:
    02/01/2012 2:09 pm

    The most significant historical contribution to quilting is difficult to define. If pressed, the invention of the cotton gin and the development of cloth would probably top the listing. However the invention of threads, dyes for coloring cloth and thread (other than inconsistent natural dyes) would pull a good second.

    Reply
  304. Cathie Claessen Says:
    02/01/2012 2:10 pm

    There are so many things that apply here, but I think that the love and time that goes into a quilt, giving you time to really think about the person/people that will be recieving the quilt qnd know that it will be keeping them warm and comfortable for years to come, and it will be passed down to another generation.

    Reply
  305. Penny Dorn Says:
    02/01/2012 2:11 pm

    I think when different publications such as the Kansas City Star started printing quilt patterns and flour/seed/ companies started making their sacks out of beautiful fabric that could be used to make quilts. I so love that era of quilting.

    Reply
  306. Debbie Long Says:
    02/01/2012 2:14 pm

    I would have to say the pioneer women who struggled to make their “new frontier” a warm, and cozy place for their family, significantly contributed to the history of quilting.

    Reply
  307. Roberta Richardson Says:
    02/01/2012 2:17 pm

    I like the fact that I can identify quilts age by fabric.
    The biggest is the ladies that signed and dated their quilts.

    Reply
  308. Paula Says:
    02/01/2012 2:18 pm

    The Civil War is probably on the first times that quilting was done by the majority. Up until then most of the fabric was brought over from England. With the war going on a lot of clothing was cut to make blocks so the quilts could be given to their love ones when they left home.

    Reply
  309. Deborah Beam Says:
    02/01/2012 2:19 pm

    Historically we learn so much about a time period by the quilts done by the peolpe. Their choice fabrics may tell us times were economically tight, so they used whatever they find. A group may have quilted the quilt together, adding a social interaction to the production of the quilt. Color choices of a period reflect the fabrics that were manufactured during that time period. These are just a few things we can learn from a quilt that show the historical significance of quilting.

    Reply
  310. Mary Connan Says:
    02/01/2012 2:22 pm

    I think the computer has opened doors to quilting with unlimited patterns and product possibilities.

    Reply
  311. Pauline Says:
    02/01/2012 2:22 pm

    I’m excited, I don’t have any of Eleanor Burns book and my stash is call her name

    Reply
  312. Pat Terry Says:
    02/01/2012 2:22 pm

    All quilts are significanty historical. Even new quilts will be cherished by those who receive them.

    Reply
  313. Bee Says:
    02/01/2012 2:23 pm

    Life… :)

    Reply
  314. Lindy Weber Says:
    02/01/2012 2:23 pm

    All the signature quilts throughout history used to raise funds, raise awareness, honor friends going far away. Such a unifying group project and bonding opportunity.

    Reply
  315. Laurie Tarnowski Says:
    02/01/2012 2:23 pm

    I would submit as my idea the use of quilts on the Underground Railroad to give messages and indicate routes and places of safety.

    Reply
  316. Bonnie Stapleton Says:
    02/01/2012 2:23 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting? — I need to think on this a bit … my first answer was the rotary cutter — but it isn’t all that long ago when it was invented but it sure has been wonderful. But thinking in a longer view I would think it would be the industrial revolution when goods began to be more readily available. The availability of cloth to make quilts gave a boost to quilting. In studying blocks that were used in the 1800’s I’m amazed to find many intricate blocks and some wonderful colors… I still love my rotary cutter though!

    Reply
  317. Cheryl Says:
    02/01/2012 2:27 pm

    I would have to say the Pioneers. Without those strong women making do with what they had, there would not be the deep quilting roots throughout this nation. Elanor Burns’ directions are always clear and easy to follow, I’d love to add her new book to my library.

    Reply
  318. Loretta Laman Says:
    02/01/2012 2:31 pm

    I can’t wait to see Elanors new book. I own most of them and love them.

    Reply
  319. coralee Says:
    02/01/2012 2:32 pm

    the cotton gin and printing material with the desire to make hand made blankets of love

    Reply
  320. Elaine Tieber Says:
    02/01/2012 2:33 pm

    The electric sewing machine saved quilting. Moist people HAVE to work and do not have time for hand work but thanks to the electric machines people are able to keep quilting alive and changing.

    Reply
  321. Marina Sharts Says:
    02/01/2012 2:34 pm

    I think the electric light wasa significant event enabling woman to work in the evenings after chores were finished.

    Reply
  322. JOANNE BUSHONG Says:
    02/01/2012 2:35 pm

    I grew up in the first industrialized city in America, Lowell, Massachusetts. The mighty Merrimack river was diverted into canals to supply water power to the turbines that turned the cogs, that moved the shuttles to produce (weave) the amazing cotton fabric we all look at as historic. Before that time all fabric was imported and expensive. Once affordable fabric was available women were able to use more than old clothes to design their quilts. My mother attempted for years to teach me to use a sewing machine and it wasn’t until I was 33 and befriended by a wonderful woman from Texas, she invited me to my first quilting class, that I realized I could sew a straight 1/4 inch seam. Then my quilting began. Now another 33 years later, my dear friend is gone, but with warning, so we hurried up to complete most of her unfinished projects. Her granddaughter completed her first quilt at twelve. So the craft goes on. I would love this book and what it teaches and remembers.

    Reply
  323. Bernie Allen Says:
    02/01/2012 2:38 pm

    To me the most significant historical contribution to quilting are the quilters and their quest to be remembered, to tell their story as they see it. To search for new ways to achive their goals. They have inspired us to follow our dreams and creativity. Persevering patterns and fabric design for future generations.

    Reply
  324. Terrie V Says:
    02/01/2012 2:41 pm

    Whenever the first person/people decided to establish a quilt museum. This ‘upped’ the value of the craft.
    I’d love to win an Eleanor Burns book and thread too!

    Reply
  325. Robin Osborne Says:
    02/01/2012 2:42 pm

    I think it was the pioneer women traveling westward in the covered wagons. They would bring quilts from home for comfort and a remembrance of the past. Their quilts tell a story.

    Reply
  326. Dorothy Ragland Says:
    02/01/2012 2:42 pm

    I believe the depression in the 30’s had the biggest impact on quilting. The need for cover and the need for creative ways to improve their lives while praying for better times inspired many women to make quilts.

    Reply
  327. Nancy Barnes Says:
    02/01/2012 2:46 pm

    Human need for protection and warmth. From the crusaders who used material quilted for protection from war weapons to the pioneers who quilted out of need to keep their families warm to current times when we want to feel the warm glow of a beautiful quilt humans have historically had a loving relationship with the quilt.

    Reply
  328. Cindy Williams Says:
    02/01/2012 2:46 pm

    I think the availability of easily available inexpensive cotton faric.

    Reply
  329. Deb Ferris Says:
    02/01/2012 2:46 pm

    I would love to have an Eleanor Burns book….and thread!

    Reply
  330. Laurie Ronholdt Says:
    02/01/2012 2:49 pm

    I am sure the pioneers used up every possible scrap of fabric to sew into something to keep warm in the cold winters. The Civil War ladies used quilts to send with their husbands to war to keep warm and we still love the feel of a warm, cozy quilt to wrap ourselves up in.

    Reply
  331. Robin Terry Says:
    02/01/2012 2:50 pm

    I believe the depression had a terrific impact. My grandparents were so poor that my grandma even made quilts out of Bull Duram tobacco pouches. She would collect them, take them apart and wash them, then turn them into quilts. She was quite a woman.

    Reply
  332. Carolyn Hoff Says:
    02/01/2012 2:51 pm

    The cotton gin.

    Reply
  333. Linda Martindale Says:
    02/01/2012 2:52 pm

    I think the quilting bees where women gathered to quilt and socialize. This was an acceptable way for women to gather and make friends, and at the same time complete a project for their home, or to help one another complete a quilt. They also were the original “recyclers” because they used every spare scrap of fabric they had.

    Reply
  334. susan litle Says:
    02/01/2012 2:53 pm

    I honestly feel that the idea of women who spent all the hours in front of the fire,sewing for their families clothes to wear, blankets to sleep under, and memories to leave their children. Also there were and are still those who quilt to make money for their families, like quilt shows, farmers markets, and the like. I think it is women in general who do for their families before themselves are the best example of this.

    Reply
  335. Lynn Mullen Says:
    02/01/2012 2:55 pm

    I believe the events of 9/11/2001 were most significant in thrusting a nation of quilters into voluminous quilt production as grassroot expressions of grief, patriotism, and desire to commemorate the victims of this national tragedy.

    Reply
  336. Jeanette Heindel Says:
    02/01/2012 2:57 pm

    I think there were many things that were significant historical contributions to quilting like the cotton gin, feed sacks,the need for women to keep their families warm. I would love to add her new book to my collection.

    Reply
  337. Susie Brown Says:
    02/01/2012 2:57 pm

    I think the historical contribution of quilting comes from the types of quilts made in different eras. . The Baltimore album quilts and crazy quilts represented the wealthy women of the 1800’s. Feed sack quilts and quilts made from dress scraps were made by those women that needed to be frugal. Amish quilts continue to reflect the beliefs of the makers.

    Reply
  338. Suzanne Says:
    02/01/2012 2:58 pm

    I believe quilting is an outlet for women to create.

    Reply
  339. Evelyn Hinson Says:
    02/01/2012 2:58 pm

    My grandmother lived through the depression and she frequently spoke of the hard times. She had a love for quilting and seemed to have always had a project going. I am one of 19 grandchildren and I believe each of us have a hand-quilted quilt from her. My love for quilting was born through her and would love the opportunity to have the Tales of First Ladies book to add to my collection.

    Reply
  340. Barbara Behringer Says:
    02/01/2012 3:00 pm

    I believe the introduction of the sewing machine was the most significant historical contribution to quilting. Prior to the sewing machine quilts might have taken years to complete.

    Reply
  341. Helen Cheney Says:
    02/01/2012 3:01 pm

    Though it isn’t 100 years old I would say the thing that changed quilting the most hands down is the rotary cutter.

    Reply
  342. justine van metre Says:
    02/01/2012 3:04 pm

    i feel like the flour sacks made a big impact on quilting.. i have quilts my grandmas made from them and i am still looking to find prints that duplicate their look and feel.. thanks justine

    Reply
  343. Brenda Dunne Says:
    02/01/2012 3:04 pm

    I think the most important contribution to the history of quilting are the women of America, from pre-revolutionary times to the depression. Their quilts, from the materials used to the designs, were direct expressions of their lives and circumstances. I would love to have her book so I could learn more about quilting history!

    Reply
  344. Sharon Arnold Says:
    02/01/2012 3:05 pm

    It has be the sewing machine for me as I do not like hand work.
    Eleanor Burns is also a big contributor. She is the first lady of quilting!!!

    Reply
  345. Bonnie Bainbridge Says:
    02/01/2012 3:07 pm

    For myself, the biggest contribution to the art of quilting is Connecting Threads. You opened me to the world of quilting by giving me the opportunity to carefully choose fabrics at my own leisure, from the comfort of home, knowing they are going to match color families and prints perfectly instead of guessing when I’m in a store. I love being able to see the shades right in front of my eyes and know they will be just what I ordered in quality fabric and only what I need instead of being told “1 yard minimum” that I hear in fabric stores. Your website is a dream come true! And your prices are fantastic compared to any quilt shop or fabric store. I love telling friends about my “find” !
    Keep up the good work..

    Reply
  346. Marylyn Judy Says:
    02/01/2012 3:07 pm

    I think the Civil War had a great impact on quilting. A second impact was the 1970’s when interest in quilting was renewed.

    Reply
  347. Vicki Writer Says:
    02/01/2012 3:08 pm

    My favorite quilting books are the historical ones. Quilting is part of our heritage as a country. Women have always quilted. Quilts often tell a “story” about the time and place when they were quilted. We can look at the patterns and fabrics to determine approximately when they were made. The condition of an old quilt can help us to determine if the quilt was used for everyday or if it was used just for special occasions.

    Reply
  348. ruth Says:
    02/01/2012 3:10 pm

    The biggest historical contribution to quilting?
    Good question, I would say the sewing machine and its availablity for everyone to be able to purchase one.

    Reply
  349. Chong Kropik Says:
    02/01/2012 3:10 pm

    As a young girl growing up in South Korea in the aftermath of the Korean War, I remember receiving packets of clothes and quilt donated from the US. Many of the fabrics were so bright and lovely and seemed to represent the United States itself. I never forgot those days, and years later when I came to the US and began quilting I began collecting fabrics that reminded me of the clothes that meant so much to people who had so little. I finally realized I had found the quilt that would make these fabrics tell their story when I stumbled across this book.

    Reply
  350. Candra Sowder Says:
    02/01/2012 3:10 pm

    I believe the thing that has contributed to the recent history of quilting is use of the rotary cutter, mat, and acrylic ruler. Without these tools in their many shapes and forms, the current generation would not be interested in quilting. These tools made making quilts easy for the beginner and fast for those whose lives are full. They have also made quilting fun and accessible.

    Reply
  351. Karen V Says:
    02/01/2012 3:12 pm

    Each generation has had a defining moment regarding quilting. My top two choices are the spirit of pioneer women who quilted out of necessity, and the invention of the sewing machine-one is human spirit, the other is technology.
    I would so love to win this book. I have many of Eleanor’s books, I made my first quilt using her “Trip Around the World” pattern. That book and her tv shows inspired me to quilt, and love the process. Thanks for having this giveaway!

    Reply
  352. Edie Pintar Says:
    02/01/2012 3:12 pm

    I think the introduction of steel, needles etc.. had the most significant contribution. Quilting is awesome and God is so good.

    Reply
  353. Christine Says:
    02/01/2012 3:14 pm

    The ladies that made quilts out of everything left over, so they could have something warm to sleep under. In the 1700 and 1800.
    For what they had I think they were VERY inovative and they were useful.

    Reply
  354. Donna Marquez Says:
    02/01/2012 3:14 pm

    The cotton gin must have played a huge roll in quilting. Wonderful cotton fabrics

    Reply
  355. Sharon C. Says:
    02/01/2012 3:15 pm

    How about the internet that enables all us beginning quilter’s to learn; as well as teachers who love what they do and are willing to share. :-)

    Reply
  356. Linda Stuart Says:
    02/01/2012 3:16 pm

    Log Cabin, Quilt in a Day was my first quilt. Eleanor is fantastic.

    Reply
  357. Debbie Dent Says:
    02/01/2012 3:20 pm

    The westward movement had a great impact on quilting as we moved west quilts became a necessity as well as self expression. It also established a connection to loved ones far away.

    Reply
  358. Terri Hume Says:
    02/01/2012 3:23 pm

    My answer would have to be the fabric & quilt patterns reflect that time period no matter which one it may be. Hard times used scraps & in easier times some spent money on more extravagant fabric.

    Reply
  359. Marty Hildebrand Says:
    02/01/2012 3:25 pm

    I would love to add another on of Eleanor Burs’ Great Book’s to my quilting shelf. My love of quilting comes from my Grandmother that quilted for a child until 91 years old. Eleanor Burns’ books have taught me many new techniques to my education and love of quilting. Love, love all her books that I have bought and read from the libray of friends.2-1-12

    Reply
  360. Kristi Van Os Says:
    02/01/2012 3:26 pm

    Early quilters of course had a great impact because they developed & used what they had out of necessity. But today’s quilters are bringing it all back! We have Quilt Guilds and bees, the internet has a great impact on today’s quilters!

    Reply
  361. Kathi Bates Says:
    02/01/2012 3:26 pm

    I believe life in general contributed to the quilts that were sewn. Designs and fabrics were dependent on what was available as well what each quilter could afford. Whether it was made with new fabric or made from the parts of used clothing. I believe quilts show how the country progressed through good times and bad. They hold keys to what people did to survive hard times as well as celebrate the good times. Quilts brought people together in the making, giving and using of them.

    Reply
  362. Marty Hildebrand Says:
    02/01/2012 3:27 pm

    Thanks for the book information on Eleanor Burns’ new book. I would love to have a copy! Marty

    Reply
  363. Christine A. Surovec Says:
    02/01/2012 3:28 pm

    Eleanor has such a great, inviting smile. I would love to add her book to my collection. Please, please pick me!
    Thank you for this opportunity.

    Reply
  364. Dorsey Clement Says:
    02/01/2012 3:30 pm

    I would say it was the westward expansion and new settlements. Once again fabric became a precious necessity. Feed and Flower sacks became the norm for Quilt tops and recycled blankets became batting. One Quilt that I’ve seen is actually 4 tops. Each one replaced as it wore out.
    Women learned to paint with fabric once again. New designs that were influenced by both Indian and Spanish colors and designs flourished. And a girl’s skill with a needle meant weather or not her family was clothed and kept warm.
    Add to that the invention of the home sewing machine—you also had machine quilting invented. Truly a time of the explosion of design and innovation.

    Reply
  365. Bonnie Bradley Says:
    02/01/2012 3:30 pm

    I think the accessability to all of the wonderful fabrics is what has made the biggest impact on quilting. I too love Eleanor Burns and she inspired me to start quilting.

    Reply
  366. Patricia Newhouse Says:
    02/01/2012 3:30 pm

    I agree that the great depression is one of the major times for the influence of quilting. Thanks for the great giveaway.

    Reply
  367. Barbara McDonald Says:
    02/01/2012 3:30 pm

    I think the most significant historical contribution to quilting was the Bicentennial in 1976. Somehow, the art of quilting was reborn during that celebration and it lead to the invention of the rotary cutter, mat and ruler within a few years. THAT was historic!!
    Thanks for the giveaway!
    Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  368. Pat Jessup Says:
    02/01/2012 3:31 pm

    Through the ages quilting has fulfilled the creative side, as well as the economical side of women. This art, done at home from the time of the fireside to todays digital machine has given women, yesterday and today, the ability to express themselves and comfort others.

    Reply
  369. Esther Sorber Says:
    02/01/2012 3:32 pm

    I think it could be the westward movement of the pioneers, forced to use what little they had.

    Reply
  370. Donna Myers Says:
    02/01/2012 3:32 pm

    I do not think there is a “most significant” historical contribution to quilting. Throughout history women and men have risen to the challenges they faced and used quilting as a means to provide for their families while also creating an outlet for self-expression.

    Reply
  371. Jean Hurst Says:
    02/01/2012 3:34 pm

    I would be hard pressed to disagree with any one so far, but I believe the development of better dyes and also better ways to manufacture fabric so that it lasts longer and can tell the story of quilting by those who have left their mark on history.

    Reply
  372. Kristine Wood Says:
    02/01/2012 3:34 pm

    I think it was the sewing machine. Quilts could be made in a much shorter period of time.

    Reply
  373. Nancy Zander Says:
    02/01/2012 3:34 pm

    I think the sewing machine and publishing of patterns contributed to the increase in quilting. Altho’ many still hand quilt, for those of us who work outside the home, the sewing machine makes it possible to complete more than one quilt before we die.

    Reply
  374. Pat Blanton Says:
    02/01/2012 3:35 pm

    The obvious choice…Eleanor Burns! She has revolutionized quilting for me. With the tools she provides along with the sewing across the grain before cutting has helped me stay square and true.
    Without her demonstrations, of the best methods she developed or learned, I would of had many, many failures.
    Thank you from the heart, Eleanor!

    Reply
  375. Denise Schellenberger Says:
    02/01/2012 3:36 pm

    I enjoy reading Eleanors books. I have even made a few quilts from these books. Family and friends love them, as much as I do. Eleanor uses what she or others have on hand. I would like to add this new book to the collection I have started. Thank you Eleanor for sharing with the quilters around the world.

    Reply
  376. Jane Levering Says:
    02/01/2012 3:36 pm

    The sewing machine has definitely made quilting and sewing in general faster and easier. Knowledge/inspiration for quilting and patterns has been greatly improved by the increased number of books and magazines now available.

    Reply
  377. Margaret Parks Says:
    02/01/2012 3:37 pm

    I think that quilt exhibitions by National Museums and magazines during the country’s Bi-Centennial of 1976 was a significant contribution to quilt history. I believe it sparked a real revival of quilting.
    I would love the new Eleanor Burns book.

    Reply
  378. Crystal Nolet Says:
    02/01/2012 3:37 pm

    Eleanor is so fun to listen and learn from. She loves our history and where would we be without it. Her books are the best. So is she. I would be so excited to have her book.

    Reply
  379. Lydia Says:
    02/01/2012 3:39 pm

    The most historical contribution to quilting has been the lack of available cloth. Women became very inventive/ creative when cloth was so dear. They cut up their clothing to make quilts. They cut up their quilts to make clothing. Embellished or utilitarian, patchwork, patched or appliqued, women did what was necessary to take care of their families. And they did it beautifully, as the hunger for beauty was valued and drove their skills.

    Reply
  380. barbara mitchell Says:
    02/01/2012 3:42 pm

    I think the best contribution to quilting was the women that started making quilts out of feed sacks . If they had not started that phase I don’t know how long it would have been before we would have fabric. I can’t even think of how tragic that would have been. If I didn’t have fabric to audition for a new quilt I am sure I would have withdrawals lol.

    Reply
  381. Leta Nef Says:
    02/01/2012 3:43 pm

    I believe the love shared by women for their families led
    them to use their creative ideas and resourcefulness to create warm and inviting quilts to shield their families from the elements. It is only a little different now.

    Reply
  382. Janis Hoffman Says:
    02/01/2012 3:45 pm

    I think that cotton gin was one of the most important things that helped the women to be able to buy cotton cloth here in the US. Then the sewing machine came along and helped women to sew faster. One of the newer sets of tools for women are the rotary cutter, board and rulers. That helped a lot of younger women in a new generation start to quilt.
    I would love to win Eleanor’s book. I met her once and she is a lovely person, both inside and out. A very sweet person.

    Reply
  383. Susan Ericksen Says:
    02/01/2012 3:47 pm

    I think the industrial revolution during the 1800s had the biggest influence on quilting. There were three major things that happened during this time that made it easier for the common family to obtain the goods needed in order to produce quilts: Electricity was harnessed, industrial processing greatly improved, and transportation improvements made it easier to get fabrics and threads to women. The creativity of quilters took off from there and has never stopped.

    Reply
  384. Carol L Says:
    02/01/2012 3:48 pm

    Many things but will say just the need for bed coverings.
    Carol L

    Reply
  385. Candace Weiss Says:
    02/01/2012 3:48 pm

    I would love to share this with my family. We are a family of who loves history and quilting too. It is exciting to see how the woman of our history used fabric from their day to day life to make a quilt. Not only are the quilts beautiful, but they are a living historical document of the cloths people wore and the fabrics that were used, loved and needed.

    Reply
  386. Becke Says:
    02/01/2012 3:50 pm

    “Necessity is the mother of invention.” – Socrates
    There are Many historical events that have contributed significantly to the craft of quilting throughout the years. I have to say, though, that the earliest American Pioneers who kept on moving west, had the earliest and maybe the most significant effect on quilting in America. They brought with them their skills from other countries, but it was the need for warm coverings that provided the impetus for their creation. It seems all our earliest quilt block patterns have come from those early American quilts, and everything has evolved from them since then.
    Thank you.

    Reply
  387. Lisa Gabriel Says:
    02/01/2012 3:51 pm

    I think the great migration across the United States. Women out of necessity made quilts for the most basic need, WARMTH! Their creativity and need for socializing fueled competion in foods and quilting. Their lack of ready made goods forced them to use/recycle all fabric, and what a beautiful job they did!! Reproduction prints are still made today….that’s how much we still admire what they made. Eleanor, of course revolutionized how we quilt today though, and made quilting accessable to anyone brave enough to give it a try.

    Reply
  388. Michele T Says:
    02/01/2012 3:51 pm

    That is an interesting question and I am not certain how to answer… except to say that people were very innovative to provide for their families with limited resources.

    Reply
  389. Patricia Cross Says:
    02/01/2012 3:53 pm

    When I think historical quilting, I think pioneer women!

    Reply
  390. Jaunita Shepard Says:
    02/01/2012 3:53 pm

    I saw Eleanor Burns at Lincoln, Nebraska where she showcased this quilt. I would love to receive a copy of the book since I’ve seen her quilt and heard her speak about the book.

    Reply
  391. Caroline Says:
    02/01/2012 3:55 pm

    This would be a fun resource to have,I am a semi history buff. Love those first ladies.

    Reply
  392. Judy Says:
    02/01/2012 3:59 pm

    I’m not sure it is the most important, but the underground railroad help run a way slaves find their next station with quilts.

    Reply
  393. Ida Hansen Says:
    02/01/2012 4:01 pm

    Eleanor’s books always include great patterns and information – I’m certain this one is as great as the others.

    Reply
  394. Kathy Jolley Says:
    02/01/2012 4:01 pm

    I love the Cival War quilts. It was the only time our country has fought each other. There was so much destruction and loss of lives. It was very sad that families and neighbors found each other on different sides.

    Reply
  395. Alice Federico Says:
    02/01/2012 4:02 pm

    I am very interested in Civil War history and especially how it affected families and women. This book would be a wonderful addition to my library. Please count me in on this contest.
    Thank you

    Reply
  396. Vickie Whalen Says:
    02/01/2012 4:03 pm

    I would say it has a lot to do with the power to create and inspire! Then neccesity!!

    Reply
  397. Joyce Carter Says:
    02/01/2012 4:03 pm

    I belive that the quilts made during the time of slavery had a lot to do with the historical contribution to the quilting industry.We have learned so much from the patterns that were used during that time. It is very exciting to read about how each pattern used helped the slaves to excape to freedom. I love Eleanor Burns and would be honored to have one of her books.She has contributed so much to the quilting world and made it easier for us to make the quilts we love.

    Reply
  398. maureen webster Says:
    02/01/2012 4:05 pm

    i just finised a quilt for my grnddaughter from 10inches squares i bought from you it is great i’m hoping to go over in mar for her 2nd birthday (oh she lives in ireland )i wanted to tell you the 10 inch squares were great i had a stroke in 97 my left hand doesn’twork and this waswhat i wrote.ate etc with for 40 yrs anyways…. the pattern called for ten inch squares it was nice not to have to cut them thanks again mo webster

    Reply
  399. Mary Ann J Says:
    02/01/2012 4:07 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?
    And my answer is: just looking at the design and fabrics used tells the story of the socio/economic and political views/events of the times. So, it is the story of history that a quilt tells.

    Reply
  400. Phyllis Says:
    02/01/2012 4:07 pm

    I love watching Eleanor Burns on the TV, and also her books have helped me a lot with her shortcuts and hints. I am a self taught quilter, just started about 5 years ago or so. I think the people who made quilts even before the Civil War did it to reuse their old clothing, or whatever they had, so they could have quilts to keep them warm. The quilts were also used for the slaves to find their way through the underground railroads.

    Reply
  401. Terry Shopbell Says:
    02/01/2012 4:11 pm

    I just LOVE Elenore Burns! I have used a couple of her patters from Victory Quilts 1940’s Sampler Quilts. One I used to make a quilt for my grandson, and two others for gifts for some soldiers on active duty.

    Reply
  402. Sandy Claessens Says:
    02/01/2012 4:12 pm

    The invsntion of the sewing machine. Eleanor has earned her own place in quilting history.

    Reply
  403. Louise Franko Says:
    02/01/2012 4:13 pm

    I agree about the sewing machine and the fabric mills.These things enabled more people to
    keep their families warm and have a creative outlet .

    Reply
  404. Angie Baker Says:
    02/01/2012 4:13 pm

    I believe the most important contribution to quilting would be the sewing machine (Singer) which women were then able to use in the home. They sewed clothes, and then from the scraps were able to express their creativity by designing and making beautiful quilt tops!

    Reply
  405. Co Says:
    02/01/2012 4:15 pm

    Eleanor is a one of a kind,enjoyable to watch..kind of like a Julia Child,always cutting up and putting together only not in the kitchen. Five stars for Eleanor

    Reply
  406. Sharon Groves Says:
    02/01/2012 4:16 pm

    I am torn between the invention of weaving & the cotton gin. I love history of textiles & your thread. Thanks.

    Reply
  407. Kathy M Boice Says:
    02/01/2012 4:16 pm

    I think everything about the history of quilting is worth archiving! I am thankful for those who have written down the history of quilting for us in such interesting format.I think the invention of the tredle sewing machine was a great contribution. Look what contributions from the electric to the computer machines will be. Who knows what the future holds for quilters!!

    Reply
  408. michelle Says:
    02/01/2012 4:16 pm

    I would have to say the sewing machine,,, I have and love my Tredle machine and one of the first Singer electric machines. I always wonder who used them and what were they making on them. I have always had a fondness for “The Pioneer Women”. What courageous females they were. i also love the history in “The Underground Railroad Quilts”.

    Reply
  409. Sheila Foster Says:
    02/01/2012 4:17 pm

    I think there are many significant historical contributions to quilting, but I think the rotary cutter is probably one of the best as it enables us to cut more accurately than with scissors and therefore make much better finished quilts.

    Reply
  410. Binks Says:
    02/01/2012 4:18 pm

    I actually have no idea about quilting history. However I do feel like the internet has definitely changed the face of the quilting community. It allows everyone, from all across the world, to communicate with, inspire, and learn from each other.

    Reply
  411. Ellen Rudert Says:
    02/01/2012 4:21 pm

    Quilting may have started out as a means to keep warm and evolved as time passed to be more then just that. I would love this book to help me evolve into a better quilter.

    Reply
  412. Wendy saint Says:
    02/01/2012 4:22 pm

    I belive that the sewing machine has added alot to quilting….to have lots of fabric and ideas will do you no good if you haven’t time to use them. Sewing by hand is nice and will produce beautiful projects but in todays world there are very few folks who have the time to do many handmade quilts.

    Reply
  413. Anita Sena Says:
    02/01/2012 4:23 pm

    I’m thinking the cotton gin made a huge impact as the cotton was ready sooner for the mills thereby increasing production and variety of fabric for the needs of the day.

    Reply
  414. Ruth W Says:
    02/01/2012 4:23 pm

    I think the most significant historical contribution to quilting would be the invention of the sewing machine. Now the creation of a quilt or for that matter any article of clothing could be made in a fraction of the time.

    Reply
  415. Nancy P. Walker Says:
    02/01/2012 4:24 pm

    Formerly, nothing was wasted. When an article of clothing began to break down, women took the good part of the clothing and either made a smaller garment or used
    the pieces to put together a quilt. The quilts of old were made out of any available material – they were mainly for warmth, not for show. Because quilts were hand sewn it was a good reason for neighbours to get together to keep up on the news while sewing together. Quilts also played a big part when slaves were trying to escape – they knew by the type of quilt or how it was displayed whether or not it was safe to stop at a particular house. Quilting through the years is such an
    interesting history – even back to the days of the covered wagons.

    Reply
  416. Kathy Says:
    02/01/2012 4:25 pm

    The quilting bee with the opportunity to share experience, time, tales, and troubles with other women…especially when your own family might be far away families moved out across the country.
    They reinforced the American spirit of industry while providing a social outlet and community support. How special it would have been to receive a quilt made by the busy hands of your neighbors and relatives.

    Reply
  417. Gretchen Johnston Says:
    02/01/2012 4:29 pm

    One of the most important contributions to quilting was the cotton gin. With the invention of the gin in 1793 it was much quicker to mill the cotton so production of cotton fabric became more affordable. Quilters can use other materials but cotton has always been a quilting favorite. I love reading books about quilting history and how quilts affected other people’s lives in history. I am so glad Eleanor Burns is giving us this perspective. I will enjoy reading her book. Thanks for this contest. It is fun reading what others have to say.

    Reply
  418. Nancy Dague Says:
    02/01/2012 4:31 pm

    Quilting — It has allowed continued creativity that many may have not known they possessed. It allows generations to share a wonderful passion and ability to leave quilts of all sizes, table runners, etc to future generations keeping us connected with fond memories of loved ones.

    Reply
  419. Marilyn P Says:
    02/01/2012 4:31 pm

    The invention of the cotton gin. Revolutionized the way cotton was made for fabric. Also, we must remember the cotton flour sack was another big event which women of the early 20th century used for making clothes and quilts.

    Reply
  420. Jane Bitz Says:
    02/01/2012 4:33 pm

    The greatest historical development that changed quilting was the fairly recent recognition that it is an art form as well as a craft. When the Gees Bend quilters (and others) had their quilts shown in galleries as art it changed the way we look at all the historical quilts that we are lucky enough to still have with us. It is (mostly) a women’s art form, so the recognition that it deserved was a long time coming.

    Reply
  421. Mary Landis Says:
    02/01/2012 4:35 pm

    I thinnk that the patterns of quilt squares tell us about the history of quilting. Weather we piece by hand or by machine we all follow some kind of pattern. They have many different names because of the different areas that we live in, but we all love the patterns.

    Reply
  422. MarciaW Says:
    02/01/2012 4:35 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?
    The capability to manufacture fabric economically so available to more people AND Singer’s sewing machines.
    Eleanor is an all time favorite of both me and my mother (we watched a rerun about Egg Money Quilts on RFDTV today). It would be wonderful to win one of her books and some of your great threads.

    Reply
  423. Carol Gray Says:
    02/01/2012 4:49 pm

    It is quilting’s contribution to history that is important. By examining quilts historical significance allows us to see back in time; what types and quality of fabrics were used helps us to understand who made them and what their status in society was or what significant part of history was occurring at that time. Quilts are an archeological value that helps us see into the past and the experiences people were having.

    Reply
  424. Karen McClung Says:
    02/01/2012 4:49 pm

    I remember my grandmother collecting quilt blocks that were printed in the newspaper. Those were the days!! Love Eleanor Burns!!

    Reply
  425. Sherrilynn Bair Says:
    02/01/2012 4:50 pm

    One of the most significant contributions to quilting is the resourcefulness of American women to make something from nothing, and the traditions of quilting bees.

    Reply
  426. Ellen Sowins Says:
    02/01/2012 4:51 pm

    I think electricity and the sewing machine are two important things that expanded quilting and sewing for the everyday person.

    Reply
  427. Elaine Tharaldsen Says:
    02/01/2012 4:53 pm

    I believe that most Historical quilts tell a story about the life of the person making the quilt. I love to see the hand stitching and piecing of these quilts.

    Reply
  428. Pam Holland Says:
    02/01/2012 4:53 pm

    I believe that the quilt designs used in the Underground Railroad signalling directions to runaways

    Reply
  429. joyce G Says:
    02/01/2012 4:53 pm

    I’d say need/scarcity/poverty was a great contributor in so many generations – from re-purposing clothing, to feed sacks, to scrap quilts, broderie perse. Looking forward to this book!

    Reply
  430. Sharon Strauss Says:
    02/01/2012 4:54 pm

    I think the sewing machine was the biggest help to quilt making. With this invention, quilters were able to make quilts so much faster than with hand stitching that they were able to do more.

    Reply
  431. vickie clark Says:
    02/01/2012 4:54 pm

    the way quilts were used in the underground railroad as maps and signals.

    Reply
  432. Michele Says:
    02/01/2012 4:55 pm

    Hard to choose just one – when our country was first settled there were no weavers from whom to buy fabric. It had to be imported and, of course, was scarce and costly. The early settlers had to use and re-use … and be darned clever about it. Then, of course, came the industrial revolution and the development of factories that could produce more affordable goods, including fabric. I am sure this encouraged women to be even more creative.

    Reply
  433. vickie clark Says:
    02/01/2012 4:57 pm

    the quilting b’s created a great way for women to grt together in an era that womens lives were restricted in a lot of ways

    Reply
  434. Sandra V Says:
    02/01/2012 5:00 pm

    The most significant historical contribution to quilting would have to be the sewing machine. Also the ability to mass produce affordable material and threads.

    Reply
  435. Tammy Petty Says:
    02/01/2012 5:01 pm

    I would say that the most significant historical contribution to quilting would be the advent of reliable dyes for quilting fabric.

    Reply
  436. Caroline S Says:
    02/01/2012 5:03 pm

    I love Eleanor Burns & her books and I would love to add this one to my quilting book library! I am a cree from the First Nations of Waswanipi and I remember when I was a child, my grandmother used to make her quilts and my mother also, my mom tells me they used to sew everything by hand to make their clothes when she was a young child, she is now 82 years old, and then the sewing machine came (the one you crank up)So I think it is the sewing maching and the handing down the art of quilting from generation to generation that makes a significant history :)

    Reply
  437. Erica Says:
    02/01/2012 5:06 pm

    Quilts provide a look into history – what colors, styles and fabric were popular. Some tell political stories and others tell the story of a family. Some are beautiful and others are utilitarian.

    Reply
  438. Lynn Gettings Says:
    02/01/2012 5:07 pm

    This is a hard question to answer, I learned very young watching my Grandmother and her Friends setting around the quilt frame quilting by hand.. But, the Ladies that came over the Oregon Trail.. that kept there quilts all the way here, and now in museums, for us to learn how they were pieced, the fabrics they used, and there hand quilting and the story that goes with the quilt. Yeah to the pioneer women… for making there quilt’s so sturdy, they have survived, wars, depressions, all that hand washing, dirt and dusty trails.. for us all to see and learn..

    Reply
  439. Beve Bemis Says:
    02/01/2012 5:07 pm

    I would think the spools of thread would have been a significant historical contribution to quilting. It facilitated easier stitching. I would love a copy of Ms. Burns’ new book. Her contribution to quilting is signifant also!

    Reply
  440. Joyce Whelchel Says:
    02/01/2012 5:10 pm

    The old quilts show how conservative people used to be
    following the old adage to use it up, wear it out, make
    it do or do without. That saying may have been used during
    WWII but was an attitude that had been prevalent many years
    before then.

    Reply
  441. Mary Marshall Says:
    02/01/2012 5:17 pm

    No matter how dire the circumstances can be, women need to create. This includes ‘birthin babies’ to assembling beautiful quilts to keep our families strong and safe.

    Reply
  442. Nancy Elkin Says:
    02/01/2012 5:18 pm

    the rotary cutter,I don’t think I would quilt if I had to cut out all the pieces by hand like my grandmother did.

    Reply
  443. Zina Says:
    02/01/2012 5:19 pm

    One of the ways quilting has contributed to history is it’s ability to tell stories. The fabrics tell about the period in which the quilts were made, whether it came from a well to do seamstress, or if it was made from disgarded shirts and was strictly used for utilitarian purposes. Also, quilting has spanned all races and countries. Those are a couple of things I love so much about quilting.

    Reply
  444. Linda Allscheid Says:
    02/01/2012 5:20 pm

    I would love to have a copy of Eleanor Burn’s new book about First Wives. How great it would be to make a quilt using the illustrated blocks! I’ve made a Civil War quilt and a ‘First Wives’ quilt would be a wonderful compliment to it.

    Reply
  445. Glenda Jones Says:
    02/01/2012 5:20 pm

    Yes, I love Eleanor Burns and her wonderful shop…try to get there at least once a year.

    Reply
  446. Virginia Landry Says:
    02/01/2012 5:21 pm

    I think the acceptance of the sewing machine as a quilting tool was significant. It hasn’t been all that long since a quilt had to be completely handmade to be considered a “real” quilt.

    Reply
  447. jackie w. Says:
    02/01/2012 5:21 pm

    I think when free patterns were printed in newspapers, magazines and on batting packages quilters were able to create a wonderful variety of quilts using purchased cloth or scraps.

    Reply
  448. Barbara Clinton Says:
    02/01/2012 5:22 pm

    I have followed Eleanor for years through her books and TV program. I love the history behind quilts and how they have played a part in our nations progress. I would love to have this book. Eleanor is inspiring and has a pleasantly amusing way of presenting historical facts. I’m sure her new book will not only be informative and delightful, but will promote the recording of our current history as well as how our modern quilt making is impacting our world. I teach quilting to young widows in Nepal, who have been abandoned and/or have been rejected by their families and villages because they are bad luck. We then sell their products in a tiny shop in KTM. Their dignity and self esteem has been restored and their hearts healed through quilting.

    Reply
  449. Pat Daugherty Says:
    02/01/2012 5:25 pm

    Scrap quilts have always and continue to figure into the historical significance of quilting. Originally the scraps left from making clothing provided a creative outlet for housewives who could not otherwise afford to create beautiful pieces. Today we can afford fabrics to make gorgeous quilts, but we continue to save scraps to make those scrap quilts. Call me “green” but no scrap gets tossed out at my house. And I recycle old clothes and linens for quilts too. Scrap quilts will always be a part of quilting history.

    Reply
  450. Pat Mosley Says:
    02/01/2012 5:29 pm

    Who wouldn’t want a book about quilting, and women that made a difference? What a treasure for any library, hopefully mine. Pat Mosley

    Reply
  451. sandy b k Says:
    02/01/2012 5:31 pm

    Availability of the range of colors used in the dying of fabrics and the invention of the cotton mills to be able to turn out numerous designs and great quantities in amounts of yards of fabrics. Love the use of different fibers and out staple – cotton.

    Reply
  452. Janet Erbes Says:
    02/01/2012 5:34 pm

    I believe the introduction of the sewing machine changed history by allowing women more freedom to enter the working force which opened possibilities for us to advance our opportunities and add our contributions to mankind.

    Reply
  453. Mary Lou Paolett Says:
    02/01/2012 5:35 pm

    Definitely the sewing machine!

    Reply
  454. Sharon Ellis Says:
    02/01/2012 5:39 pm

    The Internet is the most significant contribution as it has opened up the world of quilting to anybody who has access. From my home I can shop for thousands of fabrics, discover new ideas and techniques, learn the history of the various patterns and trends, find patterns, and share photos of finished projects. My grandmother relied on her quilting circle and a small newspaper for her patterns and techniques. I have the world at my fingertips without leaving my home.

    Reply
  455. Betty Crowdis Says:
    02/01/2012 5:40 pm

    I would have to answer “wartime”. During wartime, everyone did what they could to help out. Women quilted in their spare time or resting time to have covers for warmth, to visit with neighbors, and for gifts.

    Reply
  456. Claudia Strongman Says:
    02/01/2012 5:46 pm

    I think the most historical advance in quilting is the harvest of cotton, the cotton gin and transporting cotton worldwide.

    Reply
  457. Robin G. Says:
    02/01/2012 5:50 pm

    I would guess that in the U.S. that would be the migration of the settlers into the West. They would have less access to new dry goods and would necessarily be forces to mend and reuse their materials for as long as practical.

    Reply
  458. Jan Hall Says:
    02/01/2012 5:51 pm

    I have always been fascinated with the quilts from the underground railway era and the contributions they made to the struggle of mankind to be free.

    Reply
  459. LINDA CWIKLAK Says:
    02/01/2012 5:51 pm

    I would have to say the sewing machine.

    Reply
  460. Pam Milton Says:
    02/01/2012 5:52 pm

    So much can be told by a quilt. The fabric choice, the pattern and the actual stitching. The mind set of the quilter. War time, a marriage, a birth, even a death. The history can also be documented by the label. The quilt is an open book for all to read at there hearts content.

    Reply
  461. Judy Says:
    02/01/2012 5:55 pm

    The depression era may be a key in so many quilts being made out of necessity.Feed sacks,flour sacks and scrap clothes were combined to use in quilting.
    The Gees Bend quilters certainly made a contribution, also.

    Reply
  462. Judith Stephens Says:
    02/01/2012 5:56 pm

    The need to pass signals on to slaves escaping to the North by those involved in the Underground Railroad.

    Reply
  463. JoAnn West Says:
    02/01/2012 5:56 pm

    I don’t think that any one historical event was the greatest contributor to the craft/art of quilting. Through the ages, the overarching reason why quilters have made quilts for their loved ones is to leave behind something that will give comfort to their loved ones long after the quilt maker is gone.

    Reply
  464. Bonnie Neuberger Says:
    02/01/2012 5:58 pm

    I think it’s the quilting bee. Started years ago, it connected women to each other and gave the opportunity to work together in a “community” and share their patterns. The name may have changed over the years but guilds, clubs, or whatever your group is called still provides the same opportunities of sharing and community.

    Reply
  465. MaryBeth Says:
    02/01/2012 6:00 pm

    Recent historically, I’d say the invention of the rotary cutter is way up there. But the internet has been a terrific boon to quilting – you can find so many ideas and inspiration. Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  466. Carolyn Says:
    02/01/2012 6:00 pm

    I believe the friendship of women that were brought together in quilting bees to create masterpieces. I love this time period of quilts and the wonderful quilts that came out of it.

    Reply
  467. merle hooley Says:
    02/01/2012 6:01 pm

    The most significant thing about quilts is the person who makes it and their choices. A quilt is a window into the maker’s sole and tells a lot about them and their skill level as well as their methodology.

    Reply
  468. Tammy Says:
    02/01/2012 6:06 pm

    The patterns, they have different meanings and tell of different stories and events.

    Reply
  469. Sheila F Says:
    02/01/2012 6:06 pm

    The publishing of quilt patterns in newspapers and magazines. Also very helpful – the sewing machine. :) thank you for opportunity to win.

    Reply
  470. Diane Says:
    02/01/2012 6:09 pm

    The most historical contribution to quilting in my opinion would be the simple ability of cloth to transform lives by providing different needs to different people.
    This is a wonderful giveaway. Thanks for this opportunity.

    Reply
  471. Reine Gravier Says:
    02/01/2012 6:13 pm

    I think that it is hard to decide the significance of quilting history in that the quilts of the civil war and the history of the freedom of the Blacks from slavery and all the challenges they faced have so much to tell in the making of quilts in those eras. I believe I would have to give a nod to the latter in that they (the quilts) “wrote letters” by the diagrams that were made in the blocks to aid so many people to real freedom. They were not just a thing of beauty, but something that totally describes what America once was – and gave assistance to so many in need.

    Reply
  472. Gayle Alexander Says:
    02/01/2012 6:13 pm

    What a great question! The most significant historical contribution to quilting is the resourcefulness, adaptation and evolution of women over the years. From hand piecing to machine; from quilting by hand to the long arms of today; from the use of curtains, shirts and old clothes to the beautiful fabrics we enjoy today; from the use of quilts as a necessity for warmth in homes heated by a hearth, to the use of quilts as an artful centerpiece on the walls of our homes today; from women quilting while sitting on a bluff watching the progress of the civil war to women today, quilting while watching TV; from our mothers and grandmothers passing on their techniques to us; to the books, internet, guilds and classes at our local quilt shops and quilt shows. Women have adapted and evolved with the art of quilting. The state of the local or national economy had no affect on women’s ability to be resourceful. Eleanor has revolutionized and simplified quiltmaking bringing many more women to this artform. Women shared news from their communities, family stories and quilting tips, not to mention chocolate. We are living in yet another evolution to our art – the contributions of the men like Kaffe Fassett, Mark Lipinski, Ricki Tims and others are helping to bring this art to many others. Eleanor, keeping bringing us the history. It keeps us grounded.

    Reply
  473. Janice Treml Says:
    02/01/2012 6:14 pm

    I would say the best contribution to quilting is the sewing machine, and also the manufacture of good cotton fabric.

    Reply
  474. Suzanne Fain Says:
    02/01/2012 6:17 pm

    I am a retired history teacher and love the connection between quilts and history. I especially appreciate the the quilt blocks that are named after historical people, events, or issues. I have enjoyed reading all of the responses submitted, and they have certainly provided “food for thought”. Although I might change my mind tomorrow, I am going to say the cotton gin is my answer. Being able to clean the cotton quicker and more efficiently caused a technological “ripple effect”, leading to spinning wheels, looms, textile mills, etc.. . . which eventually gave women cloth at a price they could afford.

    Reply
  475. Leena Says:
    02/01/2012 6:19 pm

    I also think that the sewing machine….and to take it even further…before the invention of sewing machine…the needles…handstitched items which gotten more sophisticated over time with inventions…

    Reply
  476. Joni Johnson Says:
    02/01/2012 6:25 pm

    The way women through time have used every tiny scrap of fabric to make quilts, whether it be from feed sacks or worn out clothing– they were the original recylers

    Reply
  477. Pam @ Antique or Not Says:
    02/01/2012 6:31 pm

    I think it would have to be the sewing machine, which made it possible for many more people to be able to quilt much more quickly. I would love to have a copy of Eleanor Burns’ new book!

    Reply
  478. Cathryn Hepburn Says:
    02/01/2012 6:32 pm

    I believe it to be a toss up between the invention of the sewing machine and the Great Depression. The sewing machine made it easier & quicker while the Great Depression allowed women the opportunity to be more creative with what they made quilts out of and for gifts.

    Reply
  479. Barbara Kehtel Says:
    02/01/2012 6:33 pm

    I think the women that made quilts and hung them outside on a line to give direction for the underground Railroad so brave and really had a great influence on the quilting world. We still copy many of the patterns of that era.

    Reply
  480. Carla Says:
    02/01/2012 6:33 pm

    I feel the most historical contribution to sewing is the cotton materials. They have had some amazing one and continue to make incredible changes. They seem to match the era to which they are from, which I find unique. The ever changing capabilities with patterns and the fabric. Thank you for letting me enter to try and win an amazing book that would be greatly appreciated and used.

    Reply
  481. Barbara Kehtel Says:
    02/01/2012 6:33 pm

    I think the women that made quilts and hung them outside on a line to give direction for the underground Railroad so brave and really had a great influence on the quilting world. We still copy many of the patterns of that era.

    Reply
  482. Barbara Kehtel Says:
    02/01/2012 6:33 pm

    I think the women that made quilts and hung them outside on a line to give direction for the underground Railroad so brave and really had a great influence on the quilting world. We still copy many of the patterns of that era.

    Reply
  483. Bonnie Heuving Says:
    02/01/2012 6:35 pm

    I think the Amish culture make beautiful quilts and have historically had an impact.

    Reply
  484. Nadine Stupelli Says:
    02/01/2012 6:39 pm

    All of the previously mentioned events/inventions, etc. were important. But, the changes in our society that allowed for more “free time” for “recreation and creative” activities certainly did not hurt. I was lucky enough to grow up in a family where quilting was the norm. In the past 15-20 years there has been a tremendous growth as people took on quilting as a creative,leisure tie activity. I taught school for 30 years and taught 9-12 year olds simple quilting/sewing skills every year. Their parents were amazed that they could do such things. I ended up teaching lots of the parents too!

    Reply
  485. Gaile Smith Says:
    02/01/2012 6:41 pm

    I have met Eleanor twice in Paducah at the Quilt Show. Am collecting all her books by buying a couple a year. For me, the most significant history is Harriott Tubman and the way the quilts helped people by providing direction to their freedom. Quilts and quilting have also been significant in the lives of women because when the men thought they were quilting out of necessity, they were really need the social contact with other women of like mind and who provided support and encouragement for each other. The social aspect is still true for today’s quilters.

    Reply
  486. Jo Says:
    02/01/2012 6:41 pm

    The most significant thing is friendship. Historically, women have been getting together to quilt for ages. This has kept women from being isolated and has given us forever friends. We share our patterns, supplies, ideas, and each other’s ups and downs. We laugh together and cry together and lift each other up in prayer. Quilting has surpassed time and has been passed down for generations.

    Reply
  487. Shirley Janzen Says:
    02/01/2012 6:42 pm

    My answer to your question would, the use of used clothes to make quilts and the tying of the blankets to make quilts for their families.

    Reply
  488. Becky Sue Says:
    02/01/2012 6:43 pm

    I learned to quilt from Eleanor Burns back in the early days of her first books. I took a free class at a fabric store in Longmont, CO, taught by a lady who was taught by Eleanor. That leads to my idea of at least one of the most significant contributions to quilting….mothers teaching daughters and granddaughters, friends teaching friends, church ladies teaching other church ladies (and girls), etc. Sharing our craft is ages old, and we wouldn’t be sewing our favorites without the sharing. Thanks Eleanor for sharing with me!

    Reply
  489. Deborah Calyo Says:
    02/01/2012 6:43 pm

    I believe the greatest innovation in quilting has to be the rotary cutter and our new, speedier ways of cutting and combining quilt pieces. This change allows us to create many more quilts than we could when piece were cut individually and pairs of pieces were hand sewn, one by one.

    Reply
  490. Shirley Says:
    02/01/2012 6:44 pm

    Quilts are art, done by create people. Quilts are a part of history. They are to be handed down to generations of families and society.

    Reply
  491. Heidi Naber Says:
    02/01/2012 6:45 pm

    I think the most important historical part of quilting is how mostly women were able to some tell a story of what was happening in their lifetime and their families and for others the importance of saving and reusing every portion of fabric for needed coverings for survival in the new land.

    Reply
  492. judy d fraughton Says:
    02/01/2012 6:46 pm

    I think the most significant contribution to quilting was the idea by women that they could be creative in using whatever material was available and make something useful. These women knew that it would be beautiful in its own way because there was no wrong way of doing it. That is such a freedom. I hope I win because Eleanor’s instructions are the best. Thanks.

    Reply
  493. Sheri Penner Says:
    02/01/2012 6:50 pm

    I think the long arm machine has made a big historical contribution to quilting. Not always in a good sense. It replaced the social gathering of women to jointly finish a quilt. However, it also increased productivity.

    Reply
  494. Louise Says:
    02/01/2012 6:53 pm

    The range of styles,interests,means of the quilter and the theme of the quilts tell us a vivid description of the history of that era as well as the artistic expression of the quilter and sometimes something personal in a label leaving a texitle work of historical art and everyday functional household objects.

    Reply
  495. Wendy Andreason Says:
    02/01/2012 6:53 pm

    For me the most important historical contribution to quilting is the sewing machine!

    Reply
  496. Lisa Says:
    02/01/2012 6:53 pm

    I think is was just being able to use whatever fabric they had to make beautiful art work that was also used for warmth.

    Reply
  497. Ginger Says:
    02/01/2012 6:57 pm

    Sounds like a neat book. I think the 30’s gave a lot to quilting

    Reply
  498. Diane Schletz Says:
    02/01/2012 6:58 pm

    I believe that the women of our past history who sewed and quilted during the civil war and the depression were a very important part of our history. These women established groups of sewers and quilters. They made quilts for the soldiers. The quilts not only gave warmth but told stories of the civil war, slavery and the depression. Each block and several of the designs on the quilts gave messages of safe passage and of danger to warn the soldiers. These women helped shape the world we live in today and we continue this art to mold our future. The women made friendships while they were quilting and sewing.
    I myself, have taught many women of all ages how to sew and quilt. I am teaching some of my granddaughters how to sew and quilt. I want to pass on my knowledge of quilting to future generations. Quilting and sewing our my passion and I want this art to continue for future generations.
    I would love to have this book that Eleanor wrote to add to my collection of quilt books.
    Thank you,
    Diane Schletz

    Reply
  499. MoeWest Says:
    02/01/2012 7:03 pm

    I think when sewing machines became affordable for the average person, it had a big impact on the growth of quilting.

    Reply
  500. Kate Says:
    02/01/2012 7:03 pm

    I think the Civil War was perhaps one of the most influential and significant times in quilting. Quilting played a huge role in many parts of life. Beautiful quilts created from scraps to raise money for the troops, simple and practical quilts for the soldiers, and the Underground Railroad quilts which tell an important story of American history.

    Reply
  501. Ann Jones Says:
    02/01/2012 7:03 pm

    I would have to say the invention of the sewing machine. Before this time quilts had to be made by hand which we all know can take a very long time. The sewing machine changed everything about quilt making and garment making.
    I’m sure the Singer Tredle is not match for the machines today, but you know how happy those quilters were back them to get one. I too have a Singer Tredal machine and would like to one day make a quilt with it just to see how long it would take me.

    Reply
  502. Debra R. Says:
    02/01/2012 7:04 pm

    Women! We Are It ! We did a lot then just as we do a lot now!!!

    Reply
  503. Diane Schletz Says:
    02/01/2012 7:09 pm

    Please enter me in this contest. Thank you, Diane

    Reply
  504. Diane Schletz Says:
    02/01/2012 7:10 pm

    Thank you

    Reply
  505. Bridget mason Says:
    02/01/2012 7:17 pm

    The biggest contubution to quilting would be all of the women that told there lives stories in the quilts life just isn’t that hard today I mean they worked for days to turn a feed sack into usable fabric. I look at these quilts and I know all about there lives.

    Reply
  506. Julie Unholzer Says:
    02/01/2012 7:19 pm

    The most significant historical contribution that quilting has made is the visual,tactile and memory stimulation capability that transcends all ages,cultures and economic strata.

    Reply
  507. Linda Forry Says:
    02/01/2012 7:20 pm

    I know that historically wars and the invention of the sewing machine may have been a big influence on quilting. But I would propose that even today the biggest influence on quilting is the visionary quilters that share their creativity to produce wonderful quilts. No matter what time in history, these ladies used their time and talents to make do, raise funds, send family members out west with a memento from home, clothe their families and keep them warm in winter, and share their ideas and friendship in quilting bees. Today we move at high speed and have great sewing machines, but without the visionaries in the quilt world and their willingness to share with others, I believe quilting would have died long ago. Hats off to all of you quilters out there!

    Reply
  508. Ardith Says:
    02/01/2012 7:21 pm

    The “mother of necessity” and “waste not, want not”. The women during various times of our history were forced to be thrifty and using up scraps of material kept the family warm. Sewing small pieces of material together was much more practical for a quilt than clothing.

    Reply
  509. Renea Says:
    02/01/2012 7:25 pm

    I would have to say the sewing machine would have to a significant historical event to quilting. Thanks for the great giveaway.

    Reply
  510. Deanie Carroll Says:
    02/01/2012 7:26 pm

    As the spouse of a 22 year Air Force veteran, I can say that I love this country and it’s history. I am so proud to have served along with my spouse to defend her. I would love to receive a copy of this book to create history with fabric. Please enter my name in this contest.
    Thank you,
    Deanie

    Reply
  511. Lise Julien Says:
    02/01/2012 7:28 pm

    I believe the invention of sewing machine made a big difference enhanced by the publishing of magazines which popularizes quilting.

    Reply
  512. Linda Arsenault Says:
    02/01/2012 7:29 pm

    I would agree that the sewing machine was the biggest contribution to quilting. I can’t imagine doing all my piecing by hand.

    Reply
  513. Alice Says:
    02/01/2012 7:35 pm

    Pioneer women contributed to the quilting world. They were very conservative and did not waste anything. A very important contribution to the world of quilting we know today began with their talents and inspiration shared with other women I would love the opportunity to be the winner of Elleanor’s new book.

    Reply
  514. Norma Davis Says:
    02/01/2012 7:37 pm

    I think the industrial revolution contributed to new and more fabric, plus imports from England and other places, giving more artistic outlets for women.

    Reply
  515. Sharon Ray Says:
    02/01/2012 7:37 pm

    I believe quilting came about solely from need. Women made quilts from what they had to keep their families warm. From there it just grew to recent years where things evolved in big ways. The sewing machine was big but more recent has been the inventions of rotary cutters and mats and the wonderful plastic templates. This isn’t even taking into consideration all the wonderful quilting icons like Eleanor Burns who have made it easy for the rest of us. It’s all good!

    Reply
  516. Rosemary Bornes Says:
    02/01/2012 7:45 pm

    Quilts have been a way of life for so many families. It has been a way of connecting generations, as well as communities. Quilting bees have brought many together who might have never met, forming bonds of friendship lasting years.

    Reply
  517. Mary Says:
    02/01/2012 7:47 pm

    I too agree that the sewing machine was the most historically significant contribution to the art of quilting. It initially allowed for faster piecing of sturdier quilts, as well as faster quilting. Currently the sewing/quilting machines are being used as part of the quilt artist’s pallet in creating beautiful works of art, as well as a means to simply stitch a cover that keeps us feeling warm, safe and loved.

    Reply
  518. Pam Peterson Says:
    02/01/2012 7:48 pm

    The rotary cutter will most likely prove to be the most significant historical contribution to quilting. It has made quilting faster and easier and resulted in more women and men creating quilts than ever before in history.

    Reply
  519. Patricia Wilson Says:
    02/01/2012 7:48 pm

    I believe that women realizing that quilting was not just a means to an end but could be and became an art form. From Gees Bend to Baltimore Albums, women have learned to express themselves through fabric, just look at the creativity that has evolved from patterns to fabrics, quilting is (like life) creating beauty out of chaos.

    Reply
  520. Sharon Roberts Says:
    02/01/2012 7:49 pm

    The most important event in modern history to the quilting community was the 1976 contest for the 100th anniversary of America in which we were challenged to design & make quilts commemorating the event. It brought about a surge of interest in quilting that is prevalent to this day. Thanks for allowing us the opportunity to win Elenor Burns’ wonderful new book. Sharon Roberts shrnrbrts@att.net

    Reply
  521. Lidia Says:
    02/01/2012 7:53 pm

    I think that our ancestors teaching us to quilt and we as quilters passing this on from generation to generation is a very historical contribution to the quilting coummunity. May quilting live forever!!

    Reply
  522. Judith Prichard Says:
    02/01/2012 7:58 pm

    It has to be the sewing machine that saved so much time making great quilts. Then the creativity was able to com e thru. Then great teachers really inspired so many people. Eleanor Burnes is one of the best.

    Reply
  523. Jo Holloway Says:
    02/01/2012 8:01 pm

    There are so many great contributions expressed through quilting. One of the many is the wonderful patterns printed in the news papers that are still being used today. Another is the Civil War quilts that were created as well as the Quilts of Valor that are being done today.

    Reply
  524. Joanne Rhyne Says:
    02/01/2012 8:04 pm

    I think the publishing of quilt patterns in the newspaper. Also that was a time of making things out of necessity.

    Reply
  525. Joanne Rhyne Says:
    02/01/2012 8:04 pm

    I think the publishing of quilt patterns in the newspaper. Also that was a time of making things out of necessity.

    Reply
  526. Joanne Rhyne Says:
    02/01/2012 8:04 pm

    I think the publishing of quilt patterns in the newspaper. Also that was a time of making things out of necessity.

    Reply
  527. Caryn Says:
    02/01/2012 8:07 pm

    I think that the resurgence of quilting in the 70’s was the greatest historical event, since quilting was becoming a lost art. A large piece of history was dimming with the old quilts going by the wayside and becoming “invisible.”

    Reply
  528. patti Says:
    02/01/2012 8:11 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?
    altho i think the rotary cutter is the most important contribution to the act of making a quilt, probably the most historically important was the nationwide quilting contest at the chicago worlds fair in 1933.

    Reply
  529. Cindy n PC Says:
    02/01/2012 8:17 pm

    Continued reinvention

    Reply
  530. Sherry Laferriere Says:
    02/01/2012 8:17 pm

    The most important contribution to quilting was strip quilting with the rotary cutter, and Eleanor Burns contribution to everyone with her strip piecing technique.

    Reply
  531. Cynthia Says:
    02/01/2012 8:22 pm

    Necessity!

    Reply
  532. Cathy Bremer Says:
    02/01/2012 8:25 pm

    I would think the creation of the sewing machine and the advancement of thread would be my answer. I can’t imagine living without either.

    Reply
  533. mary barrow Says:
    02/01/2012 8:25 pm

    Necessity and imagination. Making use of what was available.The pioneer women

    Reply
  534. Barbara Winkler Says:
    02/01/2012 8:26 pm

    Of course, Eleanor Burns would be my choice for changing the quilting industry. And, I’d love her new book!

    Reply
  535. Pattie Medico Says:
    02/01/2012 8:27 pm

    Communication…in multiple ways, in stories, ways to teach children, numbers, letters, and animals; family histories, pointing the way to freedom, expressions of love and artistic outlet. But I feel most of all women in the past and now made quilts to share, to show, to give, to care, to challenge all in the name of LOVE.

    Reply
  536. Sandie Says:
    02/01/2012 8:29 pm

    The Quilt Index (www.quiltindex.org) is the most significant contribution to quilting. It is the data base to place quilts and find the origins of fabric, maker, patterns, etc. What a fabulous resource for any quilter.

    Reply
  537. Rachel Worley Says:
    02/01/2012 8:30 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?
    My ancestors, because “invention is the mother of necessity” and they invented quilts. These women (and men) took what they had, yard goods or scraps and made beautiful warm quilts to use for warmth, as gifts for friends, family and people who were in need and to sell to help support their families.

    Reply
  538. Vicki Says:
    02/01/2012 8:32 pm

    My grandma, who was born in 1894, took care of me when I was small. She would sit for hours at her treadle sewing machine and make beautiful quilts. I made my first quilt on that machine when I was about 6 yrs old and have loved sewing forever. I still have her patterns and many already sewn blocks. I treasure this history and family connection. The first full size quilt I made was Eleanor’s Quilt In A Day Log Cabin.

    Reply
  539. Donna Green Says:
    02/01/2012 8:32 pm

    I believe that the most historically significant contribution to quilting was the invention of the sewing machine and it’s affordability for most women. The quilt patterns printed in the newspapers were also significant because they afforded many women opportunity to try many patterns at little or no cost.

    Reply
  540. Frances Gallegos Says:
    02/01/2012 8:36 pm

    I think people during the depression had to make due with whatever they could, even if they had to use clothes,or any kind of fabric to make quilts to keep themselves warm, especially the children.

    Reply
  541. Mary Jo McKelvey Says:
    02/01/2012 8:36 pm

    In the United States, the Great Depression may have been the reason for almost every woman making quilts for her home use. By then, there were mills in the states turning out plenty of fabric and the wide spread printing of newspaper and magazines that printed patterns created easy access to those patterns.

    Reply
  542. Melanie Hermanson Says:
    02/01/2012 8:38 pm

    There are so many ways a person could answer the question
    “what is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?” but I think ONE would have to be the printing of patterns in early newspapers. That got many a housewife excited about making a quilt.

    Reply
  543. Marilyn Says:
    02/01/2012 8:38 pm

    The invention of the sewing machine gave women more free time (the thought of which frightened many men!) as they were able to do garment construction and mending more quickly. This would leave more free time for quilting.

    Reply
  544. Martha Says:
    02/01/2012 8:41 pm

    A significant contribution to the history of quilting is the documentation that many people have done about quilts, past and current and future.

    Reply
  545. Michelle Bennett Says:
    02/01/2012 8:46 pm

    There are so many great contributions to quilting. The first two I would say would be the sewing machine and the Depression.

    Reply
  546. Dee Says:
    02/01/2012 8:51 pm

    One piece of quilt history that I find fascinating is the use of quilt squares to tell a story or give information as was used with the underground railroad for slaves.

    Reply
  547. cecilia Roy Says:
    02/01/2012 8:54 pm

    I think there are many contributions to history through quilts that it is almost impossible to name one. I just know that through the different decades quilts have reflected in someway what is going on at the time, such as the time of the civil war and then the Great Depression. Quilts of today are not what our ancestors would think of as quilts but I think they would be proud of what is being done today. Much of thanks to the internet.

    Reply
  548. Marguerite Namdar Says:
    02/01/2012 8:54 pm

    I love Eleanor Burns. I find her stories really intersting. And of course my favorite fabrics are civil war. So, I would love her book.

    Reply
  549. Marilynn Walther Says:
    02/01/2012 1:02 pm

    I would love so much to win the Elenor Burns book. I do not think I even have a chance with so many entries. She is my favorite quilting teacher. She knows it all.

    Reply
  550. Marilynn Walther Says:
    02/01/2012 1:02 pm

    I would love so much to win the Elenor Burns book. I do not think I even have a chance with so many entries. She is my favorite quilting teacher. She knows it all.

    Reply
  551. Peggy Forbes Says:
    02/01/2012 9:03 pm

    In the quilter’s most recent history, I’d have to say the information highway. I have learned so many things and have access to wonderful teachers like Eleanor Burns. But for my grandmother, mother to 14 children, I’d have to say the sewing machine. She taught me on her treadle machine how to piece 8 pointed stars with newspaper templates when I was about 8 years old.
    When I worked as a sewing machine educator people (mostly men) would walk by an embroidery machine and make comments like that’s cheating, my grandmother didn’t do it that way, etc. Trust me, if my busy grandmother could have had a computerized sewing machine she’d have been a lot less harried. However, she’d never have given up her hand quilting. I’ve been told stories by my aunts how she would ‘inspect’ stitches and make them take them out if they were too large or not evenly spaced. I remember the frame suspended from the ceiling and pulled up at night so you could sleep in the beds!

    Reply
  552. joanne wisniewski Says:
    02/01/2012 9:08 pm

    I’d say the way people came together to make quilts for special occasions like weddings, and for everyday use. During the depression they used what ever was on hand. My grandmother used her old dresses and aprons.

    Reply
  553. Mary Says:
    02/01/2012 9:09 pm

    After the fact that we need a needle, thread and fabric, the scissors sure made doing intricate piecing easier. But without the sewing machine, the number of quilts an individual made was probably very limited compared to the quilters of today. So I think the sewing machine is the most significant historical contribution.

    Reply
  554. Kelly Trombley Says:
    02/01/2012 9:09 pm

    I believe one of the most influential historical influences to quilting is the patterns that were printed in the Kansas newspaper for many decades. This brought quilting to the masses and provided full patterns to make for many years.

    Reply
  555. Ellie Barstad Says:
    02/01/2012 9:20 pm

    I would say that a woman’s need to keep her family warm, make use of whatever materials were available to do so and and desire to bring some beauty into what could be a very dreary, hard scrabble existance.

    Reply
  556. Judykay Says:
    02/01/2012 9:20 pm

    Fabric! More fabric choices and better quality fabric. Thread! Lots and lots of thread choices.

    Reply
  557. Janine Tichy Says:
    02/01/2012 9:21 pm

    I agree that the sewing machine was the most significant
    historical contribution. I’ve looked at a lot of the other answers and they are many great ones. I would love to win the book by Eleanor Burns, she’s awesome.

    Reply
  558. E. Seamans Says:
    02/01/2012 9:21 pm

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting?
    Pioneer women who with their needle and thread and the need to be thrifty gave us many of the early quilts

    Reply
  559. Karen Says:
    02/01/2012 9:24 pm

    Thank you Elananor for such another great historical quilting book. The underground railroad is what stays in my mind for historical significance. The novel “Alice’s Tulips” brings that closest to understanding. Thank you for this site as well. It’s entertaing to read different views.

    Reply
  560. Rosalea Wright Says:
    02/01/2012 9:25 pm

    The Great Depression Era made one of the greatest historical contributions to quilting. I think it’s important that we contribute to our legacy with quilts to be handed down in our families with the maker and date documented.

    Reply
  561. Cartha Naylor Says:
    02/01/2012 9:51 pm

    I think that the fiber weaving factories are the most significant hiistorical contribution to quiltmaking. Without the readymade fabric, the time consumed in picking, carding, spinning, dyeing and weaving fabric was great and made fabric a labor intensive product. For most of the world population fabric was only for basic necessities. With readymade fabric women have an immediate selection of both solid color and prints for the necessary and even luxtury items like clothes, linens, curtains, and covers for furniture with the scraps available to use for quilts. Intern these could be augmented with readymade fabric to coordinate, fill out and even add ornamental fabric elements to a quilt. Thus not only was prepared fabric available but the increased choices made creativity for the common woman possible. No sewing machine, printing press, shipping service, TV or even the internet could increase quilting if first there wasn’t the large volume of factory made fabric easily available.

    Reply
  562. Cartha Naylor Says:
    02/01/2012 9:53 pm

    I think that the fiber weaving factories are the most significant historical contribution to quiltmaking. Without the readymade fabric, the time consumed in picking, carding, spinning, dyeing and weaving fabric was great and made fabric a labor intensive product. For most of the world population fabric was only for basic necessities. With readymade fabric women have an immediate selection of both solid color and prints for the necessary and even luxtury items like clothes, linens, curtains, and covers for furniture with the scraps available to use for quilts. Intern these could be augmented with readymade fabric to coordinate, fill out and even add ornamental fabric elements to a quilt. Thus not only was prepared fabric available but the increased choices made creativity for the common woman possible. No sewing machine, printing press, shipping service, TV or even the internet could increase quilting if first there wasn’t the large volume of factory made fabric easily available.

    Reply
  563. Beth Schmidt Says:
    02/01/2012 10:05 pm

    The greatest contribution to quilting is the fact that generation after generation of women continue to add to the body of quilting knowledge, with generosity and friendship. This is what makes quilting so compelling.

    Reply
  564. Margaret Feerick Says:
    02/01/2012 10:16 pm

    My second class about quilting was Quilt In a Day by Eleanor Burns and although I have bought many of her other books, the log cabin is still my favorite and I always go back to it when I can’t decide what design of quilt I want to use. It never gets old. The rotary cutter is the most important invention for quilting quickly. Love it and Eleanor Burns.

    Reply
  565. Martha Lane Says:
    02/01/2012 10:40 pm

    I think the rotary cutter is one of the most historically significant items that has been invented. When I first started quilting over 40 years ago, it was so tedious to cut each piece and mark the 1/4 inch sewing line – now it is a breeze and fun to do!

    Reply
  566. nellie diaz Says:
    02/01/2012 10:49 pm

    i would love to add this wonderful book from Eleanor Burns to my collection i have so many of her books and she even signed them to me,i just love the patterns from that era , the great depression and Eleanor explains and tell,s the wonderful story,s of the women,s behind the patterns, Eleanor,s patterns are so easy to follow ,i just love her and her wonderful family,thank you Eleanor for all your great work

    Reply
  567. Andrea K Mitchell Says:
    02/01/2012 10:56 pm

    I believe that quilts has served many purposes throughout history. Quilts were used in covered wagons as people headed west, they were hung to keep sod huts warm during cold winters, quilters sold their work in order to raise money to support the war effort. Even today, quilts are raffled to support quilt groups needs, given as gifts to family and friends. The botton line is, quilts were made for many reasons, but the biggest reason of all is that they are made with “LOVE”. Love is all we need.

    Reply
  568. Judy Forkner Says:
    02/01/2012 11:00 pm

    I think the invention of the sewing machine ranks really high.

    Reply
  569. Chris Says:
    02/01/2012 11:18 pm

    I would say the newspaper. All of a sudden women had patterns being published that they could all see and share. These patterns were passed all across the country and often reflected what was in the news. I wish someone would have kept my Grandmother’s K.C. Stars.

    Reply
  570. Nikki Says:
    02/01/2012 11:36 pm

    I have been following Eleanor on Facebook and I would have to say the Kansas City Newspaper for publishing full patterns. This allowed women to expand on their skills and truly bring quilting to a whole new level.

    Reply
  571. Carolyn White Says:
    02/01/2012 11:59 pm

    Patterns being printed on flour sacks.

    Reply
  572. Yvonne Massey Says:
    02/02/2012 12:01 am

    I have to say, I have never wone anything in my life. I am new at quilting, I have been working hard all my life and never had the time. When I was a child I sat with an elderly lady and quilted with her by hand. She had a rack that droped down from the celling, it seemed like I was there for only munits but it turned out it was hours, I think the Lord that I now have time to learn more about quilting, it should always be passed down through time. For it should always be an art. It’s a whole lot more meaningfull than going to the store and picking one up. Thank You for the oppertunity, to hopefully get a great book, that should be passed down and hopefully some thread. As it would be a great start on my new craft.

    Reply
  573. Sue Long Says:
    02/02/2012 12:02 am

    I have been sewing for 50 years (yikes!) and done every kind of hand work there is. I began quilting about 16 years ago although I made my first quilt for my older daughter 39 years ago. FOR A LONG TIME I DIDN’T THINK IT “COUNTED” AS A QUILT BECAUSE I MADE IT ON A SEWING MACHINE!!! ;-D It was a twin-sized puff patch quilt and I cut each of those squares out by hand! I also make quilted ball Christmas ornaments–40 little squares on each ball. I hated having to trace those squares on material and cut them out with scissors! The most historically significant invention/era I have seen and encountered is the rotary cutter! What a difference it makes in accuracy and speed! I had done the “trace around the shape with a pencil and ruler” method for years and am in awe of the beautifully cut shapes that quilters made before the advent of the rotary cutter but I am sure they would have appreciated the ease, facility, accuracy and speed that the modern rotary cutter would have given them.

    Reply
  574. cecilia Says:
    02/02/2012 2:25 am

    I agree with people that mentioned the sewing machine.

    Reply
  575. Barbara Kehtel Says:
    02/01/2012 6:33 pm

    I think the women that made quilts and hung them outside on a line to give direction for the underground Railroad so brave and really had a great influence on the quilting world. We still copy many of the patterns of that era.

    Reply
  576. Barbara Kehtel Says:
    02/01/2012 6:33 pm

    I think the women that made quilts and hung them outside on a line to give direction for the underground Railroad so brave and really had a great influence on the quilting world. We still copy many of the patterns of that era.

    Reply
  577. Dotty Bailey Says:
    02/02/2012 3:09 am

    I think it’s a tie between sewing machines and the American Bicentennial in 1976. Sewing machines made quiltmaking easier and faster. I can’t imagine making a quilt without my 1941 Singer! And, the American Bicentennial started up quiltmaking again in this country. It was mostly a lost art until then….

    Reply
  578. Christine Says:
    02/02/2012 3:33 am

    The Civil War when they used the making of quilts as maps for the underground railroad.

    Reply
  579. Ada Shave Says:
    02/02/2012 3:55 am

    I don’t know much about the history of quilting, but I would think is was out of need, they would cut up old cloth and make blankets (quilts). any time in history where there was hard ship, depression or war. and still today were are making quilts for solders coming home from war.

    Reply
  580. sandra morris Says:
    02/02/2012 4:03 am

    I visited a show with the quilts from the ladies of Gee’s Bend. They were so inspiring. Truly artistic talent these women displayed with only the use of the fabric scraps they had at hand.

    Reply
  581. Joanne Rhyne Says:
    02/01/2012 8:04 pm

    I think the publishing of quilt patterns in the newspaper. Also that was a time of making things out of necessity.

    Reply
  582. Joanne Rhyne Says:
    02/01/2012 8:04 pm

    I think the publishing of quilt patterns in the newspaper. Also that was a time of making things out of necessity.

    Reply
  583. Peggy Says:
    02/02/2012 4:05 am

    The most historical contribution to quilting for me would be Elias Howe or maybe it’s Walter Hunt. Take your pick put someone invented the sewing machine which is the most important piece of equipment in my sewing room.

    Reply
  584. Tammy Hempel Says:
    02/02/2012 4:10 am

    I think that there are several things that happened that made a big contribution to changing quilts. One being that the patterns that came out in the newspapers every week. This gave the ladies of the time ideas for different quilts.

    Reply
  585. Darlene Slocum Says:
    02/02/2012 4:33 am

    I think our early quilters showed that no matter how little they had there was always something to contribute to a family in need. If they had no fabric scraps they contributed food and babysitting for the quilters.
    Darlene Slocum
    5443 Blair Townhall Rd
    Grawn, Mi 49637

    Reply
  586. Charlotte Halloran Says:
    02/02/2012 4:48 am

    Necessity (the need for warm covers), and the desire for beauty.

    Reply
  587. Dolores Ingraham Says:
    02/02/2012 4:56 am

    The industrial revolution with the invention of the loom for weaving cotton into fabric.

    Reply
  588. Carol Lauer Says:
    02/02/2012 5:04 am

    I feel that today’s quilters are making a significant contribution to history by keeping the skill alive and strong. We use reproduction fabrics and patterns to tell the stories of the past and we spread our knowledge of historical quilts throughout our communities.

    Reply
  589. Liz Johnson Says:
    02/02/2012 5:11 am

    The most significant contribution to quilting is the Civil War, and the quilts made during that period. The history, the stories, and the quilts/patterns that came from the era, are all timeless and inspirational even today.

    Reply
  590. Kayanna Louise Collins Says:
    02/02/2012 5:20 am

    I believe our grandparents,aunts and all family members that quilted left us our most significant historical contribution. If it wasn’t for them we wouldn’t have our memories. That is why I quilt so I can pass on to my grandchilden the history of quilting.We can have all the sewing machines and fancy quilting tools but without the knowledge from our ancestors we would have nothing.

    Reply
  591. Marilyn Bienduga Says:
    02/02/2012 5:23 am

    The pioneer women who used any scraps they could get their hands on to make quilts to keep their families warm on their treks across the country where they established new homes were the most significant contributors to quilting.

    Reply
  592. Cheryl Unger Says:
    02/02/2012 5:29 am

    This looks like another winner in the books that Eleanor Burns has written. I will love to have this to do some more of her patterns.

    Reply
  593. Granny H Says:
    02/02/2012 5:34 am

    What an wonderful idea for an interesting book from a creative person!

    Reply
  594. Susan Reeder Says:
    02/02/2012 5:34 am

    Although the first quilts made were utilitarian, even then women worked their own patterns and imagination into them using the materials at hand. This continued from the beginning through good times and bad; the Rennaisance and the Great Depression, and women both rich and poor contributed to this rich history. Much like today, there were plenty of women who copied the works and patterns of others, but there were and still are pioneers in the field stretching their creativity to create even more new designs and ways of putting them together. We have come a long way from the women who had to “make do” with leftovers, but some of those earlier patterns remain cherished treasures, as much as the new and innovative works of today.

    Reply
  595. Donna Pheneger Says:
    02/02/2012 5:34 am

    In my mind, I think almost every quilt made has some kind of history to it. Each of us who makes a quilt is leaving a little bit of ourselves behind for the next generation. This is one reason why quilt labels are so important.

    Reply
  596. Elizabeth Smith Says:
    02/02/2012 5:38 am

    I saw the videos when Eleanor was introducing the blocks and the new book. She brought out so much information about the first ladies that I did not know. I love history and quilting and to have the two together was really inspirational.

    Reply
  597. Catherine Lehman Says:
    02/02/2012 5:45 am

    I think the Industrial Revolution contributed significantly to quilting by making a broad variety of fabrics commercially available to sewers. Instead of spending countless hours spinning and weaving their own fabric, sewers could purchase fabric and spend countless hours quilting instead!

    Reply
  598. Marie Gengarelli Says:
    02/02/2012 5:46 am

    The need for women to keep their families warm and loved from the slaves who used every scrap of fabric there owners gave to them to modern day women. Women historically get together in friendship and share this common bond of quilting for new babies, weddings, to welcome, to comfort, etc., and who passed it on to their children to carry on this wonderful tradition.

    Reply
  599. Marie Gengarelli Says:
    02/02/2012 5:46 am

    The need for women to keep their families warm and loved from the slaves who used every scrap of fabric there owners gave to them to modern day women. Women historically get together in friendship and share this common bond of quilting for new babies, weddings, to welcome, to comfort, etc., and who passed it on to their children to carry on this wonderful tradition.

    Reply
  600. Marie Gengarelli Says:
    02/02/2012 5:46 am

    The need for women to keep their families warm and loved from the slaves who used every scrap of fabric there owners gave to them to modern day women. Women historically get together in friendship and share this common bond of quilting for new babies, weddings, to welcome, to comfort, etc., and who passed it on to their children to carry on this wonderful tradition.

    Reply
  601. pam Says:
    02/02/2012 5:48 am

    It is awesome that women have preserved patterns over the years and passed them down so we can continue the tradition of quilt making today.

    Reply
  602. Marie Mangus Says:
    02/02/2012 5:57 am

    Quilting through the ages provides us with a continuos thread of information passed down from our forbearers, connecting mother to daughter, sister to sister, friend to friend,relating the events in their lives. Wether the quilt was made for a wedding,a birth,a death,or war,or peace or a simply an expression of comraderie, each carries with it a loving story that is passed down for generations to come. For me quilts provide a wonderful legacy wrapped in warmth and beauty.

    Reply
  603. Rebecca Hitchens Says:
    02/02/2012 5:59 am

    I love seeing photos of quilters’ hands and how wonderfully patient they were (are) when putting together the smallest scraps to make beautiful designs So much love went in to the quilts for the warmth and well being of their family members and friends. I appreciate and admire those quilters so much. Their work is invaluable in so many ways. Reading between the lines/pages and looking at their hands tells so many stories of all the hard work and dedication they had to their loved ones. I am always in awe of those women.

    Reply
  604. Jane Says:
    02/02/2012 6:07 am

    Wow, so many long, thoughtful answers here! I’m sure this has already been said, but how about the invention of the cotton gin? Thanks!

    Reply
  605. Jane Sherwin Says:
    02/02/2012 6:14 am

    I believe early immigration and westward expansion were significant factors in the spread and development of quilting in America. As different nationalities came to America, they brought their unique textile traditions which mingled with those of other nationalities bringing variety and vigor to early quilts. Also, because of the isolation of frontier life, quilting became an important means of socialization further adding variety and technique to quilting practices. What had begun as domestic necessary evolved into means of personal and social expression, and contributed to the democratization of America’s quilting traditions.

    Reply
  606. Carol Says:
    02/02/2012 6:16 am

    I think their beautiful patterns are an inspiration plus what they were able to make with the limited choices in fabrics. So many had to produce these quilts when all their other chores were done, late at night. It is just wonderful.

    Reply
  607. Judy Z Says:
    02/02/2012 6:19 am

    This is hard to answer because I believe each decade has had an historical contribution to quilting. The 1800’s saw improvements in dyeing and making of fabrics. The 30’s and introduced and easy way for quilters to get cotton with feedsack prints. The bicentennial started a rebirth of quilting, the age of the internet allowed us all to connect to each other. I guess my answer would be the last one, the age of the internet. We can now easily do what quilters do best, share our ideas with each other. I am continually amazed at the eye candy available to see on a daily basis just by turning on my computer.
    Thanks, I love this question!
    Judy

    Reply
  608. Ruth Ann McKean Says:
    02/02/2012 6:21 am

    As people moved west women made do with what they had, making quilts to keep their family warm then socializing with neighbor all the while providing for their families.

    Reply
  609. Linda Long Says:
    02/02/2012 6:21 am

    Eleanor Burns always has an interesting perspective on the historical as well as the entertaining aspects of quilting. She has been so intivative in the approach to combining the two processes into one in such as way it makes you appreciate both sides of the process. She makes the learning process fun and simplifies many processes into something and pertenient for today. I love her books.

    Reply
  610. Janet Says:
    02/02/2012 6:29 am

    I think the Civil War Era played a significant role in quilt history. Then again, there were improvements all along the way as history grew.
    Thanks for this opportunity.
    Janet

    Reply
  611. esther weiner Says:
    02/02/2012 6:33 am

    This looks like a book with some interesting facts to read.

    Reply
  612. jkayy Says:
    02/02/2012 6:37 am

    What beautiful fabrics! I think probably one of the most significant historical contributions to quilting was the innovation of color in fabric, in modern times probably the rotary cutter.

    Reply
  613. patriciag Says:
    02/02/2012 6:44 am

    Quilts have always been a way to record history and stories of the time

    Reply
  614. Jeanne Says:
    02/02/2012 6:50 am

    If I remember my history, quilts were used to direct escaping slaves to specific “stations” along the Underground Railroad. That would be my answer. In addition, I love Eleanor Burns’ books.

    Reply
  615. Patricia Biskie Says:
    02/02/2012 6:52 am

    I feel the enduring and strong spirit of the American woman, in reflecting her history, is behind any and all of the other factors that make quilting what it is today. During good times and bad, women always stitched together what was available to them both to keep their families warm and to express themselves sometimes in the only way they could. They made quilts to keep their loved ones warm and to keep their spirits alive.

    Reply
  616. Rita Harris Says:
    02/02/2012 7:03 am

    My neice and I just love the ELlenor Burns books and it is a thrill to find a new one. I know this will be as much fun and educational as all her past books.

    Reply
  617. Charlie DiSante Says:
    02/02/2012 7:04 am

    Te most important thing is the the need to connect. Globally, it seems that at any particular time in history when an event occured that was significant to many; going to war (making quilts for soldiers) returning from war (quilts of valor) the influence of organizations like Red Cross and even Downy.com for quilts for kids. When a need arose, quilters rose to the occasion. The most significant may be that moment when we open our hearts to make something for someone else!

    Reply
  618. Nancy Ohda Says:
    02/02/2012 7:08 am

    The invention of the sewing machine was at least one of the most important things for quilting. Although quilts can be made without it and entirely by hand, not many of us would want to do that. I enjoy hand quilting but appreciate the sewing machine for piecing.

    Reply
  619. Patti Lee Pimm Says:
    02/02/2012 7:09 am

    The creative spirit of women, they used their scraps and cast off as well as purcased fabric to create beauty, warmth, security, love and comfort through out time. Their quilts continue to bring comfort to soldiers, children in hospitals and hugs to loved ones and beauty to the world.

    Reply
  620. Dora Nobles Says:
    02/02/2012 7:11 am

    I think that the most significant historical contribution to quilting, is the way the women made use of materials they already had and made beautiful, useful quilts for their family to keep them warm during the winters. The quilts were almost a neccesity item.

    Reply
  621. Elizabeth P Says:
    02/02/2012 7:17 am

    I feel communication and the exchange of ideas and products through out history has made the greatest contibution to quilting. From the exchange of textiles along ancient trade routes to Blogs, online shopping and TV and online quilt shows; all have had an impact on the products and techniques used in quilting.

    Reply
  622. Linda Kerkemeyer Says:
    02/02/2012 7:18 am

    The best historical item in quilting is the labels. Most of us can figure patterns, but the labels tell us the story of the quilt, as to why it was made, who it was for and who made the quilt. We must all remember to label our quilts not matter how small so that future generations will be able to follow the path of the quilt.

    Reply
  623. Cathy Anderson Says:
    02/02/2012 7:20 am

    I admire that ladies were not wasteful and used their “used” garments and rags to make something beautiful and useful. Eleanor is truely an artist, I love her talent and would love to add this book to my collection.
    =^..^=

    Reply
  624. Carol Betts Says:
    02/02/2012 7:23 am

    The Civil War

    Reply
  625. Louise Wagner Says:
    02/02/2012 7:24 am

    I believe it is from the ladies that handed down all their wisdom of life’s journeys, trials, and triumphs.

    Reply
  626. Sara Moline Says:
    02/02/2012 7:27 am

    When I think back on ALL the time and dedication that it would have taken to make the beautiful quilts of yesteryear, I wonder if our spoiled current day society would be nearly as productive as our ancestors were. I can’t imagine all the templates and hand piecing, fabric swapping, but at the same time the thought of a good old fashion quilting bee would be awesome. Thank God for our guilds!! I think if my grandmothers were to answer this question it would have been feed sacks and if their grandmothers were to answer it I wonder if it would be the heartache of seeing their fathers, brothers, and sons going off to war and the sheer enormity of necessity. Now we don’t really have those issues to deal with, but the one thing I can’t imagine not having in my sewing room, in addition to that sweet Bernina would be my ROTARY CUTTER. It hasn’t been around for long in the whole realm of history, but boy, what would life be like every afternoon at nap time without it!! All 4 of my girls love Eleanor Burns on Quilt in a Day. She is always worth a good laugh and I love my DVR! It’s full of Quilt in a Day and Fons & Porter!! Thanks for the sanity. God Bless.

    Reply
  627. Marjorie Says:
    02/02/2012 7:32 am

    I believe the Civil War contributed the most variety to the quilting movement. There were the underground railroad quilts directing slave movements, there were quilts made in the North & South each commemorating their heroes & fallen as well as every day life. Both North & South made different contributions. While the colors were somber so was our country at that time. But even during war quilt life was alive & flourishing and left a record not to be equaled about American life.

    Reply
  628. Virginia Says:
    02/02/2012 7:35 am

    I think the new rulers and templates are significant.
    They provide accuracy and ease.

    Reply
  629. Joy Whitten Says:
    02/02/2012 7:37 am

    I have to believe that the quilts prepared during the civil war to guide slaves to freedom were not only ingenious, but also life saving!

    Reply
  630. Linda Harmening Says:
    02/02/2012 7:38 am

    I think the Civil war era along with the underground railroad were very significant in the history of quilts. Plus women had to be very resourceful because fabric was scarce. Just thinking up those patterns and using them as guideposts was amazing.

    Reply
  631. Debby Galloway Says:
    02/02/2012 7:49 am

    Elenor Burns and her sister Pat are great. Love to have the book.

    Reply
  632. Paula Says:
    02/02/2012 7:51 am

    Quilts chronicle women in history. Whether it was the history of the suffragate movement or a modern mom chronicling what is happening in her time now with what is important to her (be it family, social concerns, or politics). Quilts are our great legacy that we can leave behind to tell our story to our future generations.

    Reply
  633. Becky Bryan Says:
    02/02/2012 7:54 am

    I believe the most significant impact quilting had to historical events is the use of quilts to signal messages to runaway slaves in the 1800s.

    Reply
  634. Linda Says:
    02/02/2012 7:55 am

    I love Eleanor Burns. I have a few of her books. Any Eleanor Burns book is a great addition to my quilt library.

    Reply
  635. sue nevrincean Says:
    02/02/2012 8:04 am

    I would love to have this book for my husband….I started to quilt but he took over and loves it. He watches e burns all the time on t.v and tapes her.. also has alot of her rulers
    He is also a history buff and loves to work with the civil was prints This book would be great for his library

    Reply
  636. Shirley S. Says:
    02/02/2012 8:13 am

    I believe it is the stories that have been passed down through the ages from generation to generation. All dealing with the economic/social situation of that era. The needs that are met through friendships and sharing with fellow quilters. The wonderful feelings of accomplishment when that quilt is completed and the gratification from that completion. I would love to win this book.

    Reply
  637. Debbie Says:
    02/02/2012 8:16 am

    I think the Civil War AND the Great Depression caused the most imagination in quilting. The people who wanted the warm coverings had to use what was on hand, and that included scraps and tidbits of fabrics. To create such beautiful work, well, that was a work of an artist!

    Reply
  638. Patricia Says:
    02/02/2012 8:28 am

    I believe that the need for warmth along with an extemely limited supply of fabrics in our country’s colonial times is what generated the trend of recycling old clothes into quiltmaking. Thanks “sew much” for this chance to win your giveaway!

    Reply
  639. Debbie Says:
    02/02/2012 8:29 am

    I think it is the invention of the sewing machine. As the world changed and women became more than homemakers, the sewing machine enabled women to continue to produce quilts as their lives became busier and busier.

    Reply
  640. Stray Stitches - Linda G Says:
    02/02/2012 8:29 am

    Here in the United States I would say the settlers migration across the country is one of the most significant historical contributions to quilting. Women had to make do with what they had and quilting was a great way to reuse worn clothing and provide warmth at the same time. Thanks for the opportunity to enter your great giveaway!

    Reply
  641. Suzy Says:
    02/02/2012 8:32 am

    I believe manufacturing of fabric so that the masses were able to acquire fabric necessary to make quilts was a huge factor. Without fabric there is nothing to make quilts rom!

    Reply
  642. Marsha W Branca Says:
    02/02/2012 8:32 am

    The American right to use German dyes at the end of “The Great War” allowed the beautiful colors that were so popular during the 30’s and 40’s. The depression era quilts are my favorites, especially the appliques!

    Reply
  643. Barbara Ball Says:
    02/02/2012 8:41 am

    I have always been fascinated by the messages in quilts that were done by pioneer women to state the passages of life and also the quilts done that helped Negroes make their way north and let others know where there was a friendly hand. What gives more memories than a quilt with segments of one’s personal life included. What powerful messages these speical ladies ahve for anyone.

    Reply
  644. Sandra Lewis Says:
    02/02/2012 8:53 am

    I believe the single most influential entity was the invention of the sewing machine. I have been intrigued by the machine quilting done on the old treadle machines. It would have required great dexterity to work the treadle and maneuver the quilt under the needle to make designs at the same time.

    Reply
  645. Gayla Kossow Says:
    02/02/2012 8:53 am

    I think the westward movement..when pioneer women couldn’t buy material or already made blankets, quilts etc. but they had plenty of torn, ripped, pieces to use if they put them together. The thread, needles and scissors didn’t take up much space either. They also had plenty of time on their hands as they traveled west!

    Reply
  646. Dolores Thomas Says:
    02/02/2012 8:55 am

    Quilts document a period of time and can document various different things that the people who make them are feeling and seeing at that moment in time. Then they are passed down (hopefully) with the history behind them to those who did not live that time. It was a way to document when words and writing might fail. Quilting has also been one of the few things to bridge cultural gaps- young to old,rich to poor, black to white.

    Reply
  647. EvaLyn Says:
    02/02/2012 9:06 am

    In the US, I would say the civil war, possibly earlier wars but I have read less about them. The influence of the Victorian Era certainly lent its mark to the history of US quilts too. History just piques your curiosity as to what came before that – and then that – and then that.

    Reply
  648. Dorothy S. Says:
    02/02/2012 9:10 am

    Quilts that documented certain times of history such as the civil war and the depression.

    Reply
  649. Amy Illingsworth Says:
    02/02/2012 9:12 am

    The depression

    Reply
  650. Debbie L Says:
    02/02/2012 9:13 am

    As they say, “Necessity is the mother of invention.” Those early American immigrants took the scraps from making clothes, flour & feed sacks, and reworked them into beautiful,warm, loving quilts, passing down their works of art through generations yet to come.

    Reply
  651. Linda Langendorfer Says:
    02/02/2012 9:22 am

    The cotton gin. It made cotton fabric more affaradable to the common person. Before that a lot of the fabric was imported and only little bits could be bought by most women.

    Reply
  652. Becky Says:
    02/02/2012 9:27 am

    The wonderful women of the past who led the way with newspaper patterns or shared patterns and a scissor and needle who tried to make something pretty out of something to keep warm. Thank you!

    Reply
  653. Nancy V Says:
    02/02/2012 9:29 am

    What a great book idea! Biography and quilting dominate my book choices. I’m not very knowledgeable about quilt history but I imagine the invention of the cotton gin would have made affordable cotton material more accessible for sewing clothes and creating quilts. Wouldn’t those early quilters be amazed by the variety of fabrics and colors available today.

    Reply
  654. Janece Fowers Says:
    02/02/2012 9:31 am

    I think the Civil War played a very significate roll. It created a lot more need for quilts. Quilts were greately needed for warmth before electricity was invented. The sewing machine certainly made the process quicker but they were made by hand before that because of necessity. And quilting was a very social thing!

    Reply
  655. Cynthia Says:
    02/02/2012 9:37 am

    I think the celebrarion of the Bicentenial awakened new interest in our quilting heritage and our sewing skills.

    Reply
  656. Nancy Says:
    02/02/2012 9:37 am

    Cotton textiles and later the sewing machine used to reflect the socio-political times.

    Reply
  657. Jeanne P Says:
    02/02/2012 9:39 am

    So many people have said it so well in their blog posts. I agree with the importance of the development of sewing machines, cotton fabric and dying, depression era women who were frugal and used every scrap to make something useful and the part I love most . . . . the connection of people throughout the centuries, especially families that pass down their stories through their specially crafted quilts.

    Reply
  658. Glenda Mondazzi Says:
    02/02/2012 9:56 am

    My first real lesson was with Elle on the TV she so inspired me just when I needed it You see, my husband of nearly 42 years died quiet unexpected . I was in such a depression but while on the TV I noticed that Elle was there with her daily quilt blocks and soon her positivity and great smile brought me out of the desperate loneliness. Thank you so much Eleanor Burns
    Sincerely
    Glenda Mondazzi

    Reply
  659. ilean Says:
    02/02/2012 9:57 am

    this looks like a great book. enjoy making quilts from eleanor burns pattern books.

    Reply
  660. wanda Says:
    02/02/2012 10:02 am

    I believe that making of quilts out of necessity to keep warm and the commradship of the women was the biggest part of quilt making. I am a fairly new quilter and as of now I don’t own a Book of Eleanors, but would be so thrilled to win one.

    Reply
  661. Sheila Says:
    02/02/2012 10:10 am

    Such a subjective question! There are no right or wrong answers but, in my opinion, I would say that those who have taught others have provided the most historical contribution. Without them, there would probably be no quilting history. For a specific “thing” to make that contribution, without a doubt, I’d say it was the sewing machine.

    Reply
  662. jill Says:
    02/02/2012 10:14 am

    I believe it was the need to provide warmth for their family during poor times and trying to be frugal and use all the resources possible. This was true during pioneer times, wars, the depression and any other time that times were tough and lean.

    Reply
  663. Mary Britton Says:
    02/02/2012 10:15 am

    I think the poverty and thriftyness of the colonial/pioneer women contributed to the basic quilting needs of early American women; the use what you have, don’t waste a thing attitude that earlier generations followed. This provided the basic scrappy patchwork quilt.
    The quilting bee also helped with their need for socializing with other women.
    Women who could afford to buy fabric and possibly had more free time could design more specialized quilts. This gave us the chintz broderie perse and Baltimore Album quilts, as well as the more modern art quilts.

    Reply
  664. Laura Podrebarac Says:
    02/02/2012 10:23 am

    What a fun contest and such an interesting book topic!

    Reply
  665. MartyCae Klein Says:
    02/02/2012 10:44 am

    I think the internet has played a significant role in quilting.

    Reply
  666. Ginny Says:
    02/02/2012 10:54 am

    Quilting goes way back when it was done just needle and thread. Everything was done by hand and lots of patience!
    I would be pleased to have a book like this and read about it.

    Reply
  667. Lois Says:
    02/02/2012 11:02 am

    I would Love to add this book to my collection of her books she is a fantastic Lady and Great publicist and first and formost a top noch Quilter.

    Reply
  668. Donna Letteri Says:
    02/02/2012 11:05 am

    I think the most significant contribution comes from those women who, because of need, created beautiful patterns from remnants. Whether it was colonial times or the Great Depression, these women were not bound by constraints of “standard” patterns. Between fabric styles and paterns, they took what they had and made beautiful things that we try and reproduce today.

    Reply
  669. Betty HH Says:
    02/02/2012 11:12 am

    I believe it would be the invention of the sewing machine and the need to provide warmth for the family with very little means. In more recent years it would be the use of rotary cutters and strip piecing methods of which Eleanor Burns was a pioneer. It would be an honor to win her new book!

    Reply
  670. Marlene Says:
    02/02/2012 11:16 am

    One can never have too many quilt books. Our three sons love the weight of the “old quilts” and always take the ones Grandma made before the modern light weight ones. They are so cozy and give more warmth than the thinner ones we make today. But then again, the older quilts were requilted and had heavier linings so the many layers gave them that special touch.

    Reply
  671. Tori Says:
    02/02/2012 11:26 am

    What do you believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting? – – Personal necessity. Quilts were created by (primarily) women for the basic needs of their families. The need to use every scrap due to economics challenged their imagination. Today we are reaping those benefits. I thank all my ancectors (and yours too) for their hard work and patience.

    Reply
  672. Shirley Conner Says:
    02/02/2012 11:34 am

    I love to quilt the Eleanor Burns way and especially love 30’s fabric. I know this will be a well used book.

    Reply
  673. Mikie Browning Says:
    02/02/2012 11:52 am

    Quilters of the past did not have the luxury of going to the store and purchasing material. They used what they had on hand, usually old worn out clothing. (Todays quilter has an unlimited offering of specialty patterns and accessories.) Yet they managed to design beautiful quilts, as well as practical ones, to keep their families warm along with all the other things necessary to care for their families. It’s a hobby for most of us, but a necessity for them. It shows their resourcefulness, their love of family, their artistic ability and their practicality. Even though life was hard, they desired to bring beauty and love into their family’s lives.

    Reply
  674. Judy Powell Says:
    02/02/2012 12:02 pm

    The most historical…the need to create something beautiful. I really think that quilts exist because women have always had a need to create beauty in their surroundings. Quilts offered the combined opportunity to create something beautiful and functional. Lots of crafts have come and gone but quilts & quilters live on, both in a tangible product, the quilt, and in the hearts and minds of those that receive those quilts. I know that my special quilt, created at a reunion, tells the tale of my mothers’ family…not necessarily a work of art but certainly one of love and history.

    Reply
  675. sue bell Says:
    02/02/2012 12:28 pm

    my idea of what was the greatest contrubition to quilting is it gave the women a chace to do something as a group and the hard times in life made this so

    Reply
  676. Linda L.Brown Says:
    02/02/2012 12:30 pm

    as i jave been sewing for over 30 years, i find e.burns isa wonderful teacher.i would love to add this book by e.burns to my library. i watch her programs weekly on educational t.v., and learn so much to share with other quilters and friends that sew.she makes quilting fun.

    Reply
  677. Linda L.Brown Says:
    02/02/2012 12:31 pm

    as i have been sewing for over 30 years, i find e.burns is a wonderful teacher.i would love to add this book by e.burns to my library. i watch her programs weekly on educational t.v., and learn so much to share with other quilters and friends that sew. she makes quilting fun.

    Reply
  678. Robin Says:
    02/02/2012 12:32 pm

    the greatest contribution we can make to the art of quilting is to treat it like art, and share it with those we have influence over and love, BLANKET THE EARTH!

    Reply
  679. Lucy Says:
    02/02/2012 1:06 pm

    The most influential contribution has to be electricity & the industrial revolution! Without both, we wouldn’t have the range of fabrics or the tools that help us speed through projects. Quilts were lifetime labours at one point everything hand pieced and hand quilted. With today’s technology, you can whip one up in a weekend!

    Reply
  680. Anna Says:
    02/02/2012 1:34 pm

    I believe the settling of the west made the biggest impact as women had to use what they had and make do.If they didn’t have to make do they wouldn’t have been so creative in their endevors with cloth.

    Reply
  681. Lori Says:
    02/02/2012 1:41 pm

    I would love to do some of these in reproduction fabrics that I have on hand

    Reply
  682. Marie Gengarelli Says:
    02/02/2012 5:46 am

    The need for women to keep their families warm and loved from the slaves who used every scrap of fabric there owners gave to them to modern day women. Women historically get together in friendship and share this common bond of quilting for new babies, weddings, to welcome, to comfort, etc., and who passed it on to their children to carry on this wonderful tradition.

    Reply
  683. Marie Gengarelli Says:
    02/02/2012 5:46 am

    The need for women to keep their families warm and loved from the slaves who used every scrap of fabric there owners gave to them to modern day women. Women historically get together in friendship and share this common bond of quilting for new babies, weddings, to welcome, to comfort, etc., and who passed it on to their children to carry on this wonderful tradition.

    Reply
  684. Vera Clifford Says:
    02/02/2012 1:49 pm

    So many things have influenced quilting as we know it today, the cotton industry, sewing machines, magazines, even the blogs that so many of us enjoy have had their influence. I believe that cotton remains the most significant influence in the world of quilting. Imagine any type quilting without cotton??? Just wouldn’t be the same! Thank you for the giveaway.

    Reply
  685. Garnalee Says:
    02/02/2012 1:59 pm

    I think the most important historical contribution of quilting was the idea of using what you had and sharing with others your ideas.

    Reply
  686. D Holt Says:
    02/02/2012 1:59 pm

    With out a doubt.. it has to be the invention of the sewing machine.

    Reply
  687. Diane Says:
    02/02/2012 2:17 pm

    I believe the teaching of quilting to the next generation is the best history of all. My grandmother taught me so much and everytime I create a new quilt I look up above and say to grandma. What do you think of this? I know she is smiling. She would love my longarm.

    Reply
  688. Tricia Morrison -Stork Says:
    02/02/2012 2:25 pm

    There are many contributions to the history of quilting. We have the needle that we know in the 15 Century which allows us to Hand quilt. The inventions of the sewing machine (Hunt & Singer) and the cotton gin by Eli Whitney in 1793 gave us the affordibility of cotton fabric in the 1800’s made some of the biggest contribution to the history of quilting.

    Reply
  689. Carole Lee Says:
    02/02/2012 2:28 pm

    I believe that what is happening right now with the new “modern quilts” will make a dramatic difference to the history of quilting. I love the innovative ideas and creativity that is in such abundance right now. Thank you to all for sharing your creations, methods and inspirations.

    Reply
  690. Rae Powelson Says:
    02/02/2012 2:32 pm

    I think the sharing of information by women all over the world and the appreciation of each others talents and ideas has been the most historical event to change and develop the quilting industry and the love of quilting.

    Reply
  691. Robin Says:
    02/02/2012 2:37 pm

    So many contributions from making do with whatever you had to use, to electricity and the sewing machine, to socialization with quilting bees to the cotton industry, you could go on and on!

    Reply
  692. Gail Ficken Says:
    02/02/2012 3:02 pm

    I love the history of quilt’s involvement in the underground railroad movement.

    Reply
  693. Anna Willis Says:
    02/02/2012 3:03 pm

    i think it’s WOMEN (i do know men also quilt…. yippee!), and their hearts for family and function and beauty. through the years they’ve had the courage and heart to create from nearly nothing breathtaking works of art that showed their love for family, for those in need, and for their men in harm’s way. it’s their hearts-in-action over time that is the historical phenomenon that has been an ongoing “most significant contribution to quilting”. it’s not an “it”; it’s a “we”….

    Reply
  694. Holly Wotton Says:
    02/02/2012 3:17 pm

    Women’s art, caring, and resourcefulness is always interesting. As is Eleanor Burns!

    Reply
  695. Cynthia Fedak Says:
    02/02/2012 4:08 pm

    I think the quilting patterns had a big impact, they each told a story. It was one way for women to be acknowledged, by their lovely quilting. It is one art form that keeps going and getting better!

    Reply
  696. Verda Says:
    02/02/2012 4:34 pm

    The sewing machine! I would love to win the book but know that there are others as wishful as I. Thanks for running this!

    Reply
  697. Juanita Benik Says:
    02/02/2012 4:45 pm

    I love the old quilts in the early 1900’s which have lavishing embroidery. The wool embroidery is rich and beautiful. The handwork is breathtaking.

    Reply
  698. Sandy Koenig Says:
    02/02/2012 5:15 pm

    I believe the Singer Feather Weight that is what I use, and batting. I admire how the ladies used the old cloths and had sewed the quilt tops.

    Reply
  699. Nancy Z Says:
    02/02/2012 6:25 pm

    I think the most significant contribution to quilting was the power loom. The power loom made it possible to produce printed fabrics in the US. That made the price more affordable than imported fabrics. By having more affordable fabrics women didn’t have to spin and then weave their own fabrics; sometimes women still spun and wove their own fabrics because they wanted to. The power loom was patented in England about 1785, and a different version was made in the US about 1813.

    Reply
  700. Clara Diaz Says:
    02/02/2012 6:27 pm

    The sewing machine has to be one of the most significant contributions.

    Reply
  701. Julia Elliot Says:
    02/02/2012 6:48 pm

    I think the industrial revolution and the advent of commercially produced fabric must have been a huge change. Women no longer had to spin and weave their own fabric. Imagine the world of textures and colours that was opened up!

    Reply
  702. kristen Says:
    02/02/2012 6:59 pm

    I’d have to agree with the many who said that the sewing machine was the most singnificant impact on quilting. But I also have to agree with the comment about those early pioneers who made quilts out of necessity to keep warm. I’m so blessed to live in a day when we can quilt for fun and have so many fabrics at ourfingertips!!

    Reply
  703. Mrs.Darlene Bonsan Says:
    02/02/2012 7:12 pm

    I believe the Most significant Historical Contribution to QUILTING are:
    1. NEVER BEEN A LOST ART
    2. DETERMATION TO USE ANY SCRAP OF OLD DRESSES OR MENS SHIRTS OR WHAT THEY HAD TO MAKE QUILTS TO KEEP THEIR FAMILY WARM IN THE COLD LONG WINTERS.
    3. HISTORIACAL CONTRIBUTE TO QUILTING IS SEWING BY THE OLD OIL LAMPS OR BY CANDLE LITE AND NEVER GIVING UP.
    4. WOULD MAKE ALL THEIR QUILTS AND DRIVE IN THE SNOW STORMS OR ANY KIND OF WEATHER WITH HORSE AND BUGGY OR SLEDS TO GO GET THEIR PRECIOUS FABRIC TO SEW THEIR FAMILY DRESSES OR SHIRTS FOR THEIR FAMILY AND USE THE SCRAPS TO MAKE QUILTS FOR CHRISTMAS GIFTS.
    5. THEY NEVER GAVE UP QUILTING REGARDLESS HOW MANY JOBS THEY HAD TO DO LIKE MILKING THE COWS, GARDENING HELPING IN THE FIELDS AND GATHERING THE EGGS. THE WOMEN WHERE ABLE TO MULITASK AND GET THEIR JOBS DONE BY COOKING AND CLEANING AND HAULING WATER FOR THE CREW AND YET BE ABLE WHEN ALL WAS TUCK IN THE THE NIGHT TO QUILT BY THE SMALL DIM LIGHTS. THEIR JOY AND THEIR LIFE OF QUILTING.
    6. THEY TAUGHT THEIR GIRLS TO SEW AND QUILT BY HAND AND IF THEY COULD AFFORD A TREADLE MACHINE TO SEW AND QUILT.
    7. THEY DID NOT HAVE ROTARY CUTTERS AND MATS BUT HOURS AND HOURS OF CUTTING UP SCRAPS OF FABRICS AND RENMANTS AND USED TROUSERS OR USED DRESSES OR SACK CLOTH THEY CUT UP FOR A QUILT.
    8. THEY MAY HAVE WALKED MANY MILES EACH ONE TO GATHER TOGETHER TO QUILT TOGETHER AND WITH VALVES THEY HAD FOR THEIR FINE ART OF QUILTING.
    9. THE LADIES USED ANYTHING FROM WOOL TO COTTON TO FELT TO SILK TO SATIN OR ANYTHING THEY COULD TO MAKES THEIR QUILTS AND THEY WOULD LAST SO LONG AND NOT FALL APART AFTER SO MANY WASHINGS.
    10. MAY WE ALL VALVE THE DETERMATION AND THE THOUGHTFULNESS THAT WENT INTO EACH OF THEIR QUILTS THEY MADE FOR THE FAMILY TO KEEP WARM OR TO SHARE WITH THEIR LOVED ONES AND FRIENDS.
    11. VERY HARD WORKING LADIES AND HAVING MANY BABIES AND ALWAYS SO BUSY BUT AWAYS TOOK TIME FOR THEMSELVES TO SIT AND ENJOY THE PRECIOUS ART OF QUILTING.
    12.THEY ALWAYS HAD TIME FOR GOD AND FAMILY AND QUILTING AND MAY ALL OUR QUILTING FRIENDS DO THE SAME. GOD BLESS YOU ALL IN 2012 AND HAPPY QUILTING AND MAKE QUILTS FOR THE CHILDREN IN NEED OR THE CHILDREN IN THE HOSPTIAL WITH CANCER THAT NEED SOMETHING TO CUDDLE WITH.FOR THE SENIOR IN THE HOMES OR IN WHEELCHAIRS AND GET COLD ON THEIR LEGS. THE JOY OF MAKING QUILTS AND GIVING TO PEOPLE IN NEED GIVES THEM A BLESSING AND GIVES YOU ALSO A EXTRA BLESSING TOO.
    13. MY TWO MAIN BOOKS I READ IS THE BIBLE AND QUILTING BOOKS. NO OTHER BOOKS AND I LOVE ELANOR BURNS AND WATCH HER SHOW ALL THE TIME AND THE ERA OF THE OLD QUILTS AND THE CHICKENS AND OLD FARM HOMES AND THE WAY SHE THROWS THE SCRAPS OVER HER SHOULDER. MAY WE ALL BE LIKE HER WITH THE POSTIVE ATTITUTE IN LEARNING TO QUILT AND HELP EACH OTHER OUT.
    14. I HAVE MADE QUILTS FOR THE WISHING STARS WHICH ARE CHILDREN FROM BABIES TO 21 YEARS OF AGE WITH CANCER WHEN I LIVE IN COEUR D ALENE IDAHO AND THEY WHERE DONATED TO THE HOSPTIAL THERE. WHAT A JOY. I USE SCRAPS EVEN 1.5 INCHES AND MAKE QUILT BLOCKS AND IT IS WASTE NOT, WANT NOT WHEN IT COMES TO QUILTING FABRICS AND JUST LIKE THE GOOD OLD DAYS… QUILTING IS RELAXING AND HAPPY FEELING.

    Reply
  704. Janine Says:
    02/02/2012 7:28 pm

    I think one of the most significant historical contributions to quilting are the women of each era/generation, using their creativity with what was available at the time to make the perfect existential object – quilts. Quilts can meet warm the body and minister to the soul and spirit at the same time. Really, the very most important/significant contribution is that of God, creative designer extraordinare.

    Reply
  705. Kathy Pennell Says:
    02/02/2012 7:56 pm

    Industrialization is probably the most significant to quilting as well as to our entire lives in general. Industrialization made it possible for fabrics to be more readily available, but it also gave many middle-classed women the extra time to do creative arts that up until then had only been affordable to the very privileged. With fabric, thread, and needles more plentiful and at a cost within reach of the average woman, the natural creativity of women began to exhibit itself in colorful quilts and clothing. Women could express themselves through their needles and provide comfort for their familites.

    Reply
  706. meri Says:
    02/02/2012 8:02 pm

    I would love to win this book and the thread. My favorite quilt history book to date is The Quilt That Walked to Goldenl

    Reply
  707. Barb Says:
    02/02/2012 8:18 pm

    I believe the history of making something not only useful but beautiful and the joy of creativity and sharing is what has kept quilting passing down through the generations.

    Reply
  708. Georgia Schropfer Says:
    02/02/2012 8:29 pm

    Every era has it’s own contributions to quilting history.

    Reply
  709. Georgett Steele Says:
    02/02/2012 9:18 pm

    I think Betsy Ross creating our American flag is one of the biggest contributions of historical significance. The Underground Railroad quilts also contributed to the historical signigicance of our country. Both showing the freedom this country stands for.

    Reply
  710. Jackie Becker Says:
    02/02/2012 10:39 pm

    What do I believe is the most significant historical contribution to quilting? Every quilt has a story, from the beginning of the thread being made into fabric, to the quilter to the receipient there is a story to be told. Quilting is a living history and those who have documented the quilts of the past and those who are documenting the quilts of today, which will be tomorrow’s history, are the most significant contributions to quilting. Millions of us in the past and today and into the future have the knowledge and passion to quilt, but it’s those with the wisdom and expertise such as Elenor Burns who put the art of quilting into written docuemnts that will enable quilting to live forever.

    Reply
  711. Carla Therrien Says:
    02/03/2012 2:48 am

    I love Eleanor Burns. She is such a hoot! Quilting is all about honoring history.

    Reply
  712. Bea Brown Says:
    02/03/2012 3:09 am

    The placing of quilts on the clothesline to show the safe way for slaves during the Civil War. I live close to a church which was part of the Underground Railroad.

    Reply
  713. tammy butler Says:
    02/03/2012 4:20 am

    Quilting brought together family & friends! One common goal to finish a project & give to others!

    Reply
  714. elizabeth eissler Says:
    02/03/2012 4:28 am

    I would say thaat the frugality of the women of that era and the invention of the sewing machine.

    Reply
  715. Jocelyn Says:
    02/03/2012 5:28 am

    It is amazing to me that the Pioneer women were able to clothe their families and keep them warm with the left over fabric by making quilts. I’m sure it was brutal out in the west, but they comforted their families with quilts. I also think it is significant that quilting has survived through the different times of history and is now a thriving hobby.

    Reply
  716. MissMary Says:
    02/03/2012 5:34 am

    Quilting has tied generations of women together. I think it embodies some of the strongest characteristics about women: practicality, “get-it-done”, beauty, planning, artistry, warmth, community, love… Quilting has been a means of maintaining these and passing them down from one generation to another.

    Reply
  717. Jeanne Poore Says:
    02/03/2012 5:41 am

    I think that all events in our history have influenced our current quilting experience. The resources we have to the quilts made in the different eras, the written word (newspapers, magazines and books) and pictures makes it easier today for more people to learn about quilting and it’s place in history–Revoluntionary War, Civil War, WWI, The Great Depression and WWII. However, I thing that the Bi-Centennial brought quilting back into the public awareness and increased the interest in quilting that has continued through the current time.

    Reply
  718. Leah Groenwald Says:
    02/03/2012 5:53 am

    Win please

    Reply
  719. Linda Says:
    02/03/2012 6:23 am

    Hi,
    I think every generation has an influence on quilting history.I love the civil war era when quilting was not only done fron necessity but it is amazing to me that the quilt patterns were used to guide slaves through the underground railroad.How amazing is that!! My fondest childhood memories are of a child of the fifties watching my mom and her sister get together to quilt, using feed sacks, flour sacks and our dresses, my sisters and I had out grown. They were very thrifty ladies, because they had to be, and seldom bought material.Theyjust made do with what they had and still managed to produce some beautiful and usefully warm quilts. How I wish my mom were here now to help me as I’ve begun to get interested in quilting.

    Reply
  720. Paulette Doerhoff Says:
    02/03/2012 6:31 am

    I think the civil war era had some influence on the quilting world. I just love the blocks and fabric of that time.

    Reply
  721. kathy h Says:
    02/03/2012 6:32 am

    I would say industrialization. Being able to mass produce fabric so it was more affordable was a big help to quilting.

    Reply
  722. Pat Rytel Says:
    02/03/2012 6:34 am

    Love Elenor Burns books and videos. Every quilter should have some of her wonderful books and ideas on quilting in the possesion.

    Reply
  723. Becky Greene Says:
    02/03/2012 6:36 am

    I believe that the messages and directions contained in quilts used in the Underground Railroad are the most significant historical impact of quilting. To help secure the freedom of another human being is the most powerful force – that ladies could exert this force through quilting is very cool!

    Reply
  724. Linda Drazy Says:
    02/03/2012 7:08 am

    The sewing machine has proven to streamline the art of quilting through Singer offering sewing machine stations to be rented by the hour for those whom were unable to afford to own one. Singer also introduced the payment plan to make monthly payments for personal ownership of these wonderful timesaving machines.

    Reply
  725. Diane Says:
    02/03/2012 7:19 am

    The most significant historical contribution to quilting is the passing on the story of the time … the fabrics used (new or old), the design of the quilt top & backing, the quilting techniques, etc. all tell the story of the people that lived at that time. thanks!

    Reply
  726. Kathryn K. Crissman Says:
    02/03/2012 7:21 am

    I believe the establishment of the Paducah Quilt Museum is the most significant, since it recognized the need to document the history of quilting with precus examples. It continues to evolve yearly with ever changing exhibits. I was fortunate to visit, and cannot believe how totally engrossed I became as I walked throughout. I never expected to find myself spending so much time with these wonderful masterpieces!

    Reply
  727. Kathryn K Crissman Says:
    02/03/2012 7:24 am

    Sorry for the spelling—it should be “precious”, not “precus”.

    Reply
  728. Betty Freano Says:
    02/03/2012 7:36 am

    Wow there are so many but the women of the great depression era had contributed so very much in both skill and resourcefullness. Also the women of Gees Bend who had their own style. I get chill bumps whenever I get the opportunity to see these quilts. Thank you for allowing me to have an opportunity to win a book by a woman who herself has contributed so much to the quilting world.

    Reply
  729. Cynthia Says:
    02/03/2012 7:49 am

    While quilting has been a necessary and creative venue for women throughout time, I would like to present my thoughts on the beauty and painstaking creativity of crazy quilting. Here a woman’s graceful stitches and sense of embellishment shine. Not only can she show her thread skills, but all those mixes of beauty and textures, nature, hopes and dreams. One of the reasons I love crazy quilting myself.
    Thank you for your consideration.

    Reply
  730. Cheryl Hunt Says:
    02/03/2012 7:51 am

    pinoneer women

    Reply
  731. Deb Says:
    02/03/2012 8:07 am

    Sounds like a great book! Thanks!

    Reply
  732. Pamela Werth Says:
    02/03/2012 8:36 am

    I just think of what the women had to work with. Nothing like what we have today, the fabric and the notions. They also used most of the quilts for everyday. This was a need for them. But they showed their thoughts and creativity.

    Reply
  733. Billie Jean Giles Says:
    02/03/2012 8:40 am

    The need to use what they had. We are spoiled in today’s society we quilt for beauty and design — the ladies of yesteryear quilted out of the necessity to have warm quilts for their family’s beds. I’m so thankful for all of the things we have learned about quilting from our ancestors and would love to add this book to my library!

    Reply
  734. Barbara J. Heidemann Says:
    02/03/2012 8:44 am

    I believe when the slaves were fleeing for there freedom during the early colony days. The quilts helped them find their way to homes that would hide them. Without those quilts to show the slaves the way to freedom, things may have turned out quite differently!

    Reply
  735. Sharon Kofoed Says:
    02/03/2012 10:50 am

    I think of two things when I think about quilts in history. First, the Underground Railroad and how quilts would be used to pass on information. Second, the quilts and quilt tops that the pioneers took with them on the various trails. Not only do these two things provide future generations with information about those who came before them, but also shows the importance of quilts!

    Reply
  736. Annette Says:
    02/03/2012 12:00 pm

    Since I’m not a hand quilter I would have to say the sewing machine. Our former ancestors would be amazed at all of the newer sewing additions that we take for granted every day.
    We quilt now for an array of designs & fabric colors where our ancestors quilted out of need using old clothes that the family outgrew & any other fabric they could get their hands on. It was extremely hard for them.
    They were very frugal in the good ole days. Much more than we are now.

    Reply
  737. Rolanda Says:
    02/03/2012 12:18 pm

    I believe in making quilts that will be used. I am working on a heirloom quilt but every day quilts are the most fun…

    Reply
  738. Janet Says:
    02/03/2012 12:19 pm

    I would have to say the advent of electric light. It is so difficult to stitch by kerosene or gas lamp, I’m sure it must have limited sewing. Certainly not many would sew for pleasure in such light, although many sewed out of need.

    Reply
  739. Bonnie Coleman Says:
    02/03/2012 12:24 pm

    The great pioneers of my quilting ancestry inspire me with their driving determination to make both beautiful and practical items out of mere used clothing and snips of fabric. One quilt made by my grandmother during the depression has the smallest pieces sewn with such exquisite stitches. Even though the colors are drab, as from that time of practicality, her dedication to precision and quality were never “depressed”. I want to honor that legacy with my quilting!

    Reply
  740. Dolores Lambert Says:
    02/03/2012 12:38 pm

    So many tangibles enter into the answer to this provocative question, but the intangible history of quilting is the most important to me. Every stitch, hand or machine, has a message….I love you, I want to keep you warm, I want you to get well, Here is my heart, Welcome to the new baby, Don’t forget me, In remembrance, May you never be cold, Snuggle with me…….the list is endless. The history goes on as countless women, and more increasingly, men…sent and are sending their works of love, hope, and triumph!

    Reply
  741. Dorothy Moses Says:
    02/03/2012 1:14 pm

    Others have said it, and I would have to agree that the invention of the sewing machine greatly influenced the art of quilting. Women had more time to work on the art when the necessary utility quilts could be made relatively quickly. Thank you for the opportunity to win this book!

    Reply
  742. Mary Myrup Says:
    02/03/2012 2:20 pm

    That is such a simple answer. WOMEN. Without us quilting would not be where it is today. Where can you go into a room with a few people or several hundred and talk at the same time an still be heard ? You can settle your differences around a circle. You can provide comfort and love with a spool & thread. Your hopes and dreams last a lifetime and if you are lucky enough your labor of love reach many hearts with stories that went into making your quilts before you gave them away. So without all the makers of quilts I don’t think we would be where we are today without all the love that came with just our needle, thread and few scrapes of fabric. Lets keep it going for a long time. Love makes it a happy place live in.

    Reply
  743. Lin Sierra Says:
    02/03/2012 3:04 pm

    If I must choose a significant historical contribution to quilting, it would be our American quilters, people rich in resourcefulness and innovation.
    What I most love about quilts is how they reflect the time in which they were created along with their maker. They may have been made in the Depression with available materials — feedsacks or repurposed clothing. Or, they may have been created by society ladies in the late 1800’s, when fine silks, velvets, beads, and lace to adorn their crazy quilts and to display the makers’ status. They may be imbued with hidden meaning, such as the underground railroad quilts of the mid-1800s or quilts designed using hobo markers. And, they might reflect a particular culture and tradition, such as the rich histories of Amish quilts or the Gees Bend quilts of the deep South.
    Whether hand-pieced, quilted, embroidered, or machine sewn with vintage Singers or modern electronic machines, there have been many ways to create quilts. There are a myriad of styles and methods, from traditional to fine art quilts. Quiltmaking continues to reinvent itself, as new tools and materials become available to the artists, and with the current trends of colors and styles. Quilters have historical examples to draw upon, if they wish to make something traditional. There are patterns and books for us to follow, as there have been since the early 1920’s. Now we have television programs, seminars, quilt shows, and instructional DVDs to stimulate our creativity and to help us take our skill to the next level. The more adventurous and skilled may choose to draft their own patterns, perhaps using today’s electronic software and computers. Art quilters may design and create unique original artworks using nontraditional techniques. Both traditional and art quilters innovate new methods.
    What is significant to me is that a quilt reflects both the time it was created and the creator. Its source is embedded in the style, pattern, and materials employed. Quiltmaking is an act of love, and like any work of art, it reflects the state of mind and the skill of its creator. A quilt’s purpose may be utilitarian or decorative. It might be a gift to a friend, or a tribute to a loved one. All have value.
    Our quilts are a product of a point in time, a place, and at least one person. They express our history and mirror our culture — past and present. What I most treasure in the heritage of American quiltmaking is its reflection of the continuum of time itself, of our collective memory, which ebbs and flows, and which manifests itself in this dynamic art form that creatively expresses the nature of our culture and people.
    (I submitted this same entry earlier, but don’t see it appearing after several hours, so thought something might’ve gone wrong with the connection. Thanks!

    Reply
  744. Lynda Lynn Says:
    02/03/2012 3:27 pm

    I think that the rotary cutter made the most significant changes in quilt making. Even the women that made quilts years ago have changed over to the rotary cutter. Women with arthritic hands can use this tool when they cannot grip scissors any more and the speed it has added to cutting out a quilt is great.

    Reply
  745. kathy mitchell Says:
    02/03/2012 4:24 pm

    Quilts are made for many purposes, by many different people, from many different places, but I truly feel (after reading all the Elm Creek series) that the underground railroad, need the quilts to survive. I learned much from these books and am proud to be a quilter.
    Kathy

    Reply
  746. janae gertner Says:
    02/03/2012 5:49 pm

    I love to hear stories of how a quilt began and why it was made. I believe that the great depression was the greatest thing to happen concerning quilts because it gave women a reason to come together and share their lives as well as their scraps. I would love to add this book to my small collection of favorites. Thank you..

    Reply
  747. Marnie P Says:
    02/03/2012 6:57 pm

    I can’t pick the most important thing , I think history has an effect on our quilting and has changed our styles of quilts many times. I am so glad so many books exist that tell the history of our quilts. I would love to have another History book of quilts and love Eleanore Burns.

    Reply
  748. Barbara Says:
    02/03/2012 7:04 pm

    No one can ever know the exact amount of influence each first lady had on her husband, each of whom was the most powerful man in the U.S. in his lifetime. Most of these women did quilting and needlework. There were quilts at Valley Forge and Gettysburg, and they served as guides for the Underground Railroad. Quilts traveled West with the conestoga wagons, and patterns were printed in farm wife journals and the newspapers of the Great Depression. Though somewhat forgotten in the turbulent ’60s, quilts have come back in force. They are now more popular than they ever were, and we must encourage our daughters to continue this great tradition, as well as encourage them to become the most powerful person in the country.
    Lastly, I would love to have a copy of this book for my school library. My students just finished a project on the First Ladies, and I am sure they would be delighted to read this book. Thank you!

    Reply
  749. Reta Hinds Says:
    02/03/2012 8:18 pm

    I think my Greatgrand mother,grandma and mother are my inspiration and the Kansas City Star that they got patterns and ideas from. We now have Eleanor Burns and all the talented people to help us make new history.

    Reply
  750. Debbie Lee Rowley Says:
    02/03/2012 8:20 pm

    I think that the SEWING NEEDLE was revolutionary for woman to quilt. Even today with all the new inventions the SEWING NEEDLE is still a basic necessity to be able to quilt.

    Reply
  751. KatieQ Says:
    02/03/2012 8:37 pm

    I think the most significant contribution to quilting as we know it today is the sewing machine. I believe the most significant contribution in recent years is the rotary cutter.

    Reply
  752. Vanessa VanTrease Says:
    02/04/2012 5:10 am

    As I sit here and think about this question so many answers pop into mind. I think of people like Eleanor Burns who began teaching quilting and creating books to walk people through the process of making quilts but then I also thought of the Kansas City Star newspaper who provided free patterns to thousands of ladies. These patterns are still printed and used today!

    Reply
  753. nena Says:
    02/04/2012 6:18 am

    I think the most significant contribution to quilting today is the internet. With the use of the internet you are able to connect to other quilters around the world for ideas, support, help, ecouragement,and of course…friendship. Having the use of the internet had really enhanced my quilting creativity and ability.

    Reply
  754. Nina Mocniak Says:
    02/04/2012 6:33 am

    After using traditional methods of quilting for years and then seeing how quilting changed when Eleanor Burns introduced her strip piecing along with other quick cutting and sewing methods, I nominate that as the most historical contribution to quilting. Another contribution that is right up there is the rotary cutter along with the rotary cutting ruler.

    Reply
  755. Penny Says:
    02/04/2012 8:20 am

    I think the most significant historical contribution to quilting are quilts made before and during the Civil War that helped the runaway slaves to find safe havens.

    Reply
  756. jane kendle Says:
    02/04/2012 8:37 am

    The printed patterns, and better fabric

    Reply
  757. Beverly Bensing Says:
    02/04/2012 9:10 am

    I believe that the most significant contribution was the the creativity and imagination of the woman who made these quilts. Today we “modern” quilters often copy or create a pattern because we like the colors or the shapes or the decorator statement it adds to our homes. Historical quilts all have a story to tell from the fabrics used to the design. A significant event in the family or community, to chronicle a family’s history, or something more definitive like “you are safe here” or “go this way” to things more personal like a mother’s love surrounding her child with warmth and familarity. Historicl quilts are truly treasures we should never forget.

    Reply
  758. Debbie Bitzer Says:
    02/04/2012 10:00 am

    I believe the Cival War era was the most significant time when quilts where used to show the slaves how to travel through the Underground Railroad. I’ve made two Underground Rairoad quilts and one of them is in the Underground Church in China. I wanted my brothers and sisters in Christ to see and hear the story of America’s Underground Church history durring our Cival War time.

    Reply
  759. RANCHMOM Says:
    02/04/2012 10:02 am

    I think the colonist and pioneers contributed alot to our present day quilts, they needed to keep the family warm, using quilts on beds, walls and windows. A quilt could be made with left over scraps of new and used fabrics, the designs could tell story and show the creativity of the maker. It was the womens way of expressing herself and also it was a social gather for many women when the quilt frame was put up and the quilting bees began.

    Reply
  760. Pat Fasone Says:
    02/04/2012 10:12 am

    I believe the most significant Historical contribution to quilting would be the invention of home sewing machines. This invention, alone, made it possible to produce beautiful quilts quicker, leading to more creativeness.

    Reply
  761. Lori Firman Says:
    02/04/2012 10:28 am

    Quilting has made such a historical mark, from using cloth sacks, family clothing, to the hidden markings for the undergound railroad, they have left their mark in history. The first quilts were made out of necessity and were just scraps pieced together. Next, these scraps were put together to make a pattern. Then, these patterns were put together to make a quilt. These original patterns are still used to this day. It continues to amaze me how these colonial women created these quilts by the light of oil lamps or candles!
    Eleanor Burns was the very first quilting book I own. It would be such a privilege to be awarded this next book of hers!!

    Reply
  762. Barbara S Says:
    02/04/2012 10:55 am

    Well, that’s a very broad question, but as a person returning to sewing after an absence of many years, I’m going to say that I think the rotary cutter and mat have revolutionized sewing and quilting.

    Reply
  763. Julie Rae Says:
    02/04/2012 11:39 am

    For myself, I would not attempt quilting without a sewing machine nor a rotary cutter. I’ve tried and know that would be a deal-ender! Totally love Eleanor Burns. Her books/patterns might actually be third on my list of must-haves to be a quilter! Thanks for the chance to win!

    Reply
  764. Brenda Howard Says:
    02/04/2012 12:02 pm

    I think the most significant contribution to quilting is perseverance to the art. Although it started out as an art of necessity it became a source of pride, love, comfort and a way to share events, history, heritage and craftsmanship.

    Reply
  765. roseann Says:
    02/04/2012 1:31 pm

    Each era has had an historical impact on quilting, but overall, I think that the invention of the sewing machine and industrialization, including the computer age, stand out. Additionally, people historically and currently have a need or desire to be thrifty, reuse, recycle,communicate information, preserve memories, commemorate events, etc. for future generations. All of these continue to impact the evolution of the craft.

    Reply
  766. Sarah V. Says:
    02/04/2012 1:35 pm

    I think that the industrial revolution, leading to the abundance of textile mills in the US was the most significant historical contribution to quilting.

    Reply
  767. Annette Boersma Says:
    02/04/2012 2:20 pm

    I’m not sure I could say this is the most important historical contribution to quilting but it was very interesting to me. Back when I lived in the South Pacific, a great Hawaiian quilter came to our group to help us learn Hawaiian quilting. She was explaining that when the missionaries came to Hawaii, their wives started teaching the Hawaiian women to make quilts. The Hawaiian ladies thought it was so silly to get nice dress fabric and then cut it up into small pieces and then sew it back together, so they came up with the thought of just using 2 solid pieces of fabric and shaping it with their scissors as they appliquéd the designs on. They created beautiful historic pieces of art and didn’t waste much fabric. Now today we have a beautiful, cultural history of quilting producing something definitely identifiable as a Hawaiian Quilt!

    Reply
  768. Janet Angell Says:
    02/04/2012 2:21 pm

    I think the sewing machine. Without it there would not be so many people sewing for a hobby.

    Reply
  769. Barb Says:
    02/04/2012 2:28 pm

    I love the fact that quilting is a way for each of us to keep in touch with our ancestors. This book will help me keep that bond. We can use it to teach history to our children. I would love th have a copy to add to my library.

    Reply
  770. Jackie Says:
    02/04/2012 2:29 pm

    I think slavery and the underground railroad was at least the most interesting if not the most significant historical contribution to quilting.

    Reply
  771. Barb Says:
    02/04/2012 3:14 pm

    I think there are several, Eleanor Burns and her revolutionary methods; the rotary cutter; need and necessity; several of the First Ladies and much much more! I can’t tell you how much I would love to win this book!

    Reply
  772. Sandra Says:
    02/04/2012 3:37 pm

    I think printing of quilting patterns would be the answer to this question.

    Reply
  773. Diane Wright Says:
    02/04/2012 3:54 pm

    Fabrics. I love all of the historical fabrics and also the production of the many reproductions. With the help of our wonderful designers who dig up these designs we are learning much about our historical beginnings.

    Reply
  774. Linda Says:
    02/04/2012 5:43 pm

    The invention of the sewing machine impacted women’s lives. Sewing became faster freeing women to do other things.

    Reply
  775. Sharon Amador Says:
    02/04/2012 6:24 pm

    I would love to make a quilt from this book and also to learn more about our past.

    Reply
  776. Faith Fisher Says:
    02/04/2012 6:25 pm

    I think that perhaps the most significant historical event to affect quilting would be the invention of the sewing machine. The sewing machine made it possible to create beautiful quilts in less time. When you can create something and see the finished product in a relatively short time, (as compared to before the sewing machine), it inspires you to want to do it again. Less time=more quilts!

    Reply
  777. Simone Garcia Says:
    02/04/2012 7:37 pm

    Just new to quilting and would love this!

    Reply
  778. Sandy Rader Says:
    02/04/2012 8:59 pm

    I believe it was two-fold. It was the Baltimore Album quilts recording each communities area of interests recording historical events. Secondly, it was the farm communities where women had little money and they made use of left-over or used fabrics for necessities like everything from clothing, quilts for warmth and household decor. Women were the heroes of their times.

    Reply
  779. Kathleen Irons Says:
    02/05/2012 12:14 am

    From Betsy Ross creating our Nations Flag to Freedom for the slaves to find their way. To women sewing Remembrance Quilts from their family’s faded and out grown cloths. There was pride and love sewn with every stitch, That we should all try to remember when we are working on our own Quilts.

    Reply
  780. Dianna Says:
    02/05/2012 5:24 am

    I am a fan of history and first ladies. I have been a fan of Eleanor Burns since I went to a class of hers many, many years ago. I am sure she does a great job representing the first ladies in her new book. Can’t wait!

    Reply
  781. Muriel Guthro Says:
    02/05/2012 5:47 am

    I would love to win this book. Two years ago I made the under ground railroad quilt by Eleanor Burns in a quilting class I was taking. I just loved it when it was finished .

    Reply
  782. Kathy Dahms Says:
    02/05/2012 7:41 am

    How many lives were possibly saved because the pioneer
    families had quilts to protect them from the bitter cold
    of the long winters. That had to be what a quilt was
    originally made for. Not for their beauty, but for their
    usefulness.

    Reply
  783. Linda Says:
    02/05/2012 7:49 am

    Such a long history of quiltmaking – I have no idea what the most significant contribution would be but I’d love to win the book.

    Reply
  784. Susie Rose Says:
    02/05/2012 8:43 am

    I feel that the most significant contribution has been the development of batting that you can quilt wider than 3″ apart. This allows a more creative, freeform, artistic, quilting designs on any quilted item. Also the wide variety of quilt batting that has been manfactured today; heat resistant, extremely low loft to super thick high loft…and just about everything in between.

    Reply
  785. anne baughman Says:
    02/05/2012 11:04 am

    I am personally thinking that there is no one incident to the quilting that has been done over the generations, but the ongoing ingenuity of women from all the generations who found a way to use fabric and other materials to make beautiful quilts to keep warm and decorate their homes. The fact that we are still doing this with all the technology that is available is even more astounding. There are lots of ways that creativity is shown over the generations. Quilts have come to be the step back and will continue to be the step forward to generations unknown.

    Reply
  786. Lavonna Campbell Says:
    02/05/2012 5:34 pm

    The Industrial Revolution was a great boom to quilters. It made cotton material more readily available and affordable to the masses.

    Reply
  787. Louise Jordan Says:
    02/05/2012 5:52 pm

    I believe that the bicentennial celebration had the biggest impact on the current quilting revival that has provided modern quilters with so many new tools, techniques and inspiration.

    Reply
  788. Nancy Sue Says:
    02/05/2012 7:20 pm

    I believe the internet has a GInormous role in quilting history. Although it’s fairly new, the internet has enabled us to spread fellowship, designs, patterns, history, online shopping, and tutorials (video, and blogging) to an unlimited quilting community. 50 years from now we are going to say, remember when…blogging just started….

    Reply
  789. Pam Peterson Says:
    02/05/2012 7:33 pm

    Tough question to answer as I am not thick with historical quilt knowledge. However, i do think that the cotton gin led the way to increased speed of cotton harvest and there fore greater use of cotton fabrics for women of all economic means.
    Eleanor’s book sounds VERY interesting. Thanks fo the opportunity to win it.

    Reply
  790. Odie Keith Says:
    02/05/2012 8:56 pm

    I believe the depression era was important in the history of quilting. People had to be resourceful with whatever material they had including flour and sugar sacks as well as using worn out clothing cut up to make some parts of the quilt.
    I got a chance to meet Ms. Burns at the International Quilt Show and Festival in Houston, Texas last November. She was as lovely and charming in person as she appears on TV and on her DVDs.

    Reply
  791. LORI/MD Says:
    02/06/2012 7:10 am

    would love to add this to my collection and make some of them using civil war and reproduction fabrics

    Reply
  792. Julie kaller Says:
    02/06/2012 7:30 am

    I believe that of great signifcance to our history were the quilts produced during the Civli War. The underground railroad quilts probably saved, hundreds, if not thousands, of prople from certain death. The messages relayed in these quilts were avenues for people to achieve their freedom. What more important thing can you do but save a life?
    Julie Kaller

    Reply
  793. Tresa Says:
    02/07/2012 8:09 pm

    What a great book, I love history and this would be a treasure to have!

    Reply
  794. Madeline Cornwell Says:
    02/09/2012 10:26 am

    I love histoical books and one on quilting would be a great addition. I think there are many times quilting was very important but thinking of how important it was for the pioneers settling our country has to be one of them.

    Reply
  795. Donna Says:
    02/10/2012 6:50 pm

    How does one enter to win this book? I would love to have one if it is still going on.

    Reply
  796. Dorothy Wilbur Says:
    02/22/2012 4:14 pm

    I’m 88 and came late to quilting after retiring from Human Resources. But it has given me a new lease on life. I love reading about it and of course doing it.

    Reply
  797. Joan Says:
    02/29/2012 6:38 pm

    I think the rotary cutter revolutionized the quilt industry along with the mats and rulers.

    Reply
  798. matching hawaiian clothing Says:
    08/17/2012 12:07 am

    Awesome for the post. Very informative, keep up with the good work!

    Reply
  799. Janet M Heliker Says:
    09/20/2013 8:13 pm

    I believe the most valuable thing in the history of Quilting was the heart, mind, hands and spirit of women. Working by candle light with crude scissors and scraps of left-over clothing was the beginning of beauty born of stark necessity. These women created the first steps which opened our world of fabric art and luxury.

    Reply

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