Great Pressing Tools – On Sale!

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3 comments » staff projects, Tools

Connecting Threads is currently having a 25% – 40% off sale on selected tools for ironing & pressing, including many new items! This started out as a blog posting on the Hot Hemmer since several of our staff just ordered one, but evolved to encompass lots of our handy ironing products.

Hot Hemmer
This Clover product is part of the new Press Perfect line of tools by Joan Hawley of Lazy Girl Designs. It is 5” x 6”, heat-resistant, non-slip, thin fiberboard with gridded lines to help with marking, turning, folding, and pressing straight hems, round corners, and interior or mitered corners. You choose a width, fold fabric over the edge and press. It can be used with a dry or steam iron.

Hold It Precision Stiletto
This useful Clover tool can be used as a stiletto at the sewing machine to guide fabric; the bent tip allows for good control and visibility. The angled, heat-resistant silicone end grips fabric so you don’t burn your fingers near the iron.  

 

The Hot Hemmer would be helpful anytime instructions say to fold and press. The pictures below show how I used it when making a two-fabric napkin that has the back fabric folded to the front as a mitered frame. The instructions say “Fold edge at 1/4” and 1”.” The Hold It Precision Stiletto helped me fold and stabilize the fabric near the iron.

 

Point 2 Point Turner
The Point 2 Point Turner helps make those sharp points in a mitered corner. It worked well for making the points sharp on some Dresden Plate sections – I can’t show you because it is surprise coming up in future catalog!

 

I plan to use the Hot Hemmer when I make box pleats for the skirts around my sewing tables. It will help with measuring and pressing the fold. Once the pleats are made, I will use it to hem the skirts – but I have to get out my manual to remember how to use my blind hem foot!

 

I asked the staff what other uses they had in mind for the Hot Hemmer. Judy said it would be good for hemming pants and pressing the folds on the envelope back of pillows such as our Pillow-to-Go Pillowcase pattern. Katrina thinks it would be great to use to turn edges twice when making straps for bags. Laraine used it to make ¼” folds before inserting trim into the hem of a reversible skirt. Karen said she could have used one when pressing the folds on the bottom of  a bag.

 

Iron Finger
This 5/8″ x 9-1/4″ Clover tool, also part of the Press Perfect line, is a multi-purpose, heat-resistant pressing tool with two ends; it can press with or without an iron. The spatula end is used for finger pressing and point turning. It can be used to push French seams out for a cle
an finish or any time you need to work in tight places without getting your finger near the iron. The picture shows using the handle as a seam roll to press seams open.  


IronSlide Ironing Board Cover
I have enjoyed my oversized Big Board ironing board for years. My last cover, which was cotton duck, worked well but was looking a little dirty and old. I was hesitant to buy a silver ironing board cover because they can be slippery and I need all the help I can get with pressing triangles! I am pleased with the new cover I ordered by Bo-Nash Inc. The silver surface reflects the iron’s heat, yet it seems to grip the fabric well. If you have a big, rectangular ironing board, order the Giant size, item number 82149. The regular size is 82148.

 

Oliso Pro Smartiron
The Oliso iron, which we use in the Connecting Threads sewing area, raises and lowers so you never have to sit the iron up vertically. This saves wear and tear on arms from repeated lifting of the iron. The handy 30-minute shut off keeps the iron on while you are pressing and off when you are not.

 

Iron Covers
We carry two brands of iron covers. They both have steam holes, can be used in place of a pressing sheet for delicate fabrics, protect the iron from fusible adhesives on fabric, and can be left on the iron. The Bo-Nash IronSlide Shoe is on shown on the left and the Clover Iron Safe on the right. Please note that the Oliso’s Scorchguards™ (the feet that raise the iron) are not designed to use with covers.

 

Iron Cleaners
I have used both Iron Clean and Iron Off with good results over the years. Just the other day I got some gooey stuff on my iron from pressing a piece of fabric that had residual glue from a label. I was glad I had an Iron Clean sheet handy!

 

Clover Mini-Iron and Wooden Holder
This small iron works well for those times when you want to press in a small space, small appliqué pieces, by the sewing machine, in a class, or when you don’t want to get up to the ironing board a zillion times. I love it for paper-piecing, especially freezer paper-piecing, when I want the heat only in a small area. I am going to try it with Kanzashi folded fabric flowers (check back for that blog) as an alternative to finger pressing. The wooden holder provides a safe place to lay the mini-iron down.

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These are only some of the tools on sale…be sure to check other products. Our company’s mission is “to inspire and enable you to create beautiful things” and having the right tools helps! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3 responses to “Great Pressing Tools – On Sale!”

  1. Alisha Says:
    02/14/2014 4:23 pm

    Really informative post, Ann! Thanks so much for all of the great info.

    Reply
  2. Vicki Barnett Says:
    02/20/2014 10:54 am

    I just purchased the Hot Hemmer and on the outside of the package it says “see instructions inside for details” on how to use it. Unfortunately, there are no instructions inside the package. Could you please tell me how I can get a copy of the instructions? If there are online instructions, please provide link.
    Thanks!
    Vicki

    Reply
  3. Ann Says:
    02/20/2014 2:35 pm

    Vicki, there are brief instructions on the packaging. The way the package came, they are sort of inside under the hot hemmer. But you are right, there are no instructions on other side of the packaging. I did a fairly thorough internet search trying to find ways to use it for my blog and only came across short, general descriptions of the product – but no instructions. I would say the photos in my blog probably demonstrate its use as much as anything.

    Reply

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